ST. LOUIS -- No way Allen Craig and the St. Louis Cardinals would get tripped up in one of the wildest World Series endings imaginable.

A rare obstruction call on third baseman Will Middlebrooks let Craig score with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning, finishing off a madcap play that sent the Cardinals over the Boston Red Sox 5-4 Saturday night for a 2-1 Series lead.

"I'm in shock right now," St. Louis catcher Yadier Molina said.

So was most everyone at Busch Stadium.

The Cardinals poured from the dugout to congratulate Craig. The Red Sox also rushed to the plate, to argue with the umpires. The fans seemed too startled to cheer.

A walk-off win? More like a trip-off.

"Tough way to have a game end, particularly of this significance," Red Sox manager John Farrell said.

After an umpire's call was the crux of Game 1 and a poor Boston throw to third base helped decide Game 2, this night combined both elements.

Molina singled with one out in the ninth off losing pitcher Brandon Workman. Craig, just back from a sprained foot, pinch-hit and lined Koji Uehara's first pitch into left field for a double that put runners on second and third.

With the infield in, Jon Jay hit a grounder to diving second baseman Dustin Pedroia. He made a sensational stab and threw home to catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia, who tagged out the sliding Molina.

But then Saltalamacchia threw wide of third trying to get Craig. The ball glanced off Middlebrooks' glove and Craig's body, caroming into foul territory down the line.

After the ball got by, Middlebrooks, lying on his stomach, raised both legs and tripped Craig, slowing him down as he tried to take off for home.

"I just know I have to dive for that ball. I'm on the ground. There's nowhere for me to go," Middlebrooks said.

Third base umpire Jim Joyce immediately signaled obstruction.

"With the defensive player on the ground, without intent or intent, it's still obstruction," Joyce said. "You'd probably have to ask Middlebrooks that one, if he could have done anything. But that's not in our determination."

Craig kept scrambling.

"He was in my way. I couldn't tell you if he tried to trip me or not. I was just trying to get over him," the Cal product said.

Left fielder Daniel Nava retrieved the ball and made a strong throw home, where Saltalamacchia tagged a sliding Craig in time. But plate umpire Dana DeMuth signaled safe and then pointed to third, making clear the obstruction had been called.

"I was excited at first because we nailed the guy at home. I wasn't sure why he was called safe," Middlebrooks said.

"We're all running to home to see why he was called safe. We didn't think there was any obstruction there, obviously. As I'm getting up, he trips over me. I don't know what else to say."

Said Cardinals slugger Matt Holliday: "You hate for it to end on a somewhat controversial play."

"You would like for it to end a little cleaner, but that's part of it," he said.

Joyce and crew chief John Hirschbeck said they'd never seen a similar game-ending play.

A neat coincidence, though: In 2004, umpire Paul Emmel called obstruction on Seattle shortstop Jose Lopez, ruling he blocked Carl Crawford's sightline and giving Tampa Bay the game-ending run. Emmel was the first base umpire on this night, too.

To some Red Sox fans, the tangle might've brought back painful memories from the 1975 World Series. In Game 3, Cincinnati's Ed Armbrister wasn't called for interference by plate umpire Larry Barnett when he blocked Boston catcher Carlton Fisk on a 10th-inning bunt. Fisk made a wild throw, setting up Joe Morgan's winning single.

Craig returned for this Series from a sprained left foot that had sidelined him since early September. After an awkward slide on the final play, he hobbled off the field in apparent discomfort.

  • The Cardinals' Carlos Beltran is this year's recipient of the Roberto Clemente Award.

    Beltran was seated next to Clemente's widow, Vera, when he was honored Saturday, about an hour prior to Game 3 of the World Series.

    St. Louis Cardinals’ Allen Craig gets tangled with Boston Red Sox’s Will Middlebrooks during the ninth inning of Game 3 of baseball’s
    St. Louis Cardinals' Allen Craig gets tangled with Boston Red Sox's Will Middlebrooks during the ninth inning of Game 3 of baseball's World Series Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, in St. Louis. Middlebrooks was called for obstruction on the play and Craig went in to score the game-winning run. The Cardinals won 5-4 to take a 2-1 lead in the series. (AP Photo / David J. Phillip)

    Beltran has contributed more than $4 million to his Carlos Beltran Academy in Puerto Rico and has hosted fundraising efforts throughout the year.