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TV crews gather on Mountain View Drive on Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, the site of the freshly repaired "Lafayette sinkhole" where on Dec. 2 the Mountain View Drive overcossing of Lafayette Creek washed out. Contractor CC Myers repaired the washed out overcrossing in nine days. (Sam Richards/Staff)

LAFAYETTE -- What was once feared would disrupt Mountain View Drive residents for months ended up being fixed after only nine days of around-the-clock construction.

Work to restore the overcrossing of Lafayette Creek, about four blocks south of Mt. Diablo Boulevard, was essentially finished Friday, and was set for a noon reopening to vehicle traffic. Friday's reopening was not only earlier that the original "into the spring" estimates after the Dec. 2 washout, but four days before the revised Christmas Day estimate.

Mayor Mike Anderson was at Friday's "soft" opening, and he didn't have to walk far to get there. He lives next to the creek on Mountain View.

Did where he lives have anything to do with how fast the street got fixed?

"Everyone keeps saying that," he said, before countering that Mountain View Drive serves as part of an important alternative route to Mt. Diablo Boulevard when that main route gets clogged.

"Also, there was a broken sewer line here, and we needed to fix that right away," Anderson added.

The 80-by-40-foot sinkhole, 15 feet deep, was created when the pipeline under the street became clogged with debris amid Dec. 2's heavy rains, and water dammed there, washing away the ground under the street.

The renowned Rancho Cordova-based construction firm C.C. Myers Inc. was called in to do most of the work; Bay Cities Paving also did substantial work on the restoration project, said City Manager Steven Falk. The repairs cost about $750,000, he said.

Anderson joked that he'll have trouble getting to sleep now that the loud construction work is done. Neighbor Todd Ericson said he took it all in stride.

"It's been a little hectic with all the equipment and so on," he said. "But it's nature; you live on the creek, you deal with it."