NEW ORLEANS -- Chris Culliver likes telling people, "Cully in the house," which is his way of announcing his presence and alerting us to start paying attention.

That's what the 49ers' nickel cornerback blurted to me Wednesday morning when he was a bit perturbed that I was interviewing starter Tarell Brown, and not Culliver.

"Cully in the house, too," Culliver said from across the table.

Well, Cully's all over the nation now, and probably the world.

After his brutish, insensitive homophobic comments to a radio station (made at Tuesday's Media Day) were relayed through the Super Bowl media megaphone Wednesday afternoon, Culliver will have all the attention he could ever want.

At Thursday's final player media session, Culliver will be surrounded, and every word and gesture will be weighed and measured.

That is, if Culliver is in the house Thursday.

I think the 49ers will make sure Culliver makes an in-person apology or clarification, though it might be brief.

At the Super Bowl, the worst distractions are the ones that last the longest, and the 49ers' best chance to cut this one off is to nudge Culliver in front of the cameras and have him admit his foolishness.

He can believe whatever he wants to believe, but his words, in the ultra-public Super Bowl setting, were inappropriate, small-minded and not befitting a representative of any sports franchise.

The 49ers put out a strong condemnation of Culliver's words Wednesday, and team president Gideon Yu followed that with his own comment on Twitter.

"I love our team and our players," Yu said. "I absolutely abhor discrimination. These don't have to be mutually exclusive feelings ..."

Will this be a game-changing moment? Probably not, though it probably does not do much for Culliver's focus.

But this episode is just another reminder that attention, and attention-seeking, isn't always the best thing for careless minds.