Iran will sue Hollywood over Oscar-winning film "Argo" because of the movie's alleged "unrealistic portrayal" of the country, Iranian media reported Tuesday.

How do you sue all of Hollywood? Do you get, say, the Capitol Records building, the Viper Room, the Hollywood sign, and a couple of strip clubs to be thrown in later?

Several Iranian news outlets, including the pro-reform Shargh daily, said French lawyer Isabelle Coutant-Peyre is in Iran, talking with officials over how and where to file the lawsuit. According to Entertainment Weekly, she is also the lawyer for notorious Venezuelan-born terrorist Ilich Ramirez Sanchez, known as Carlos the Jackal.

This sounds like job for Jason Bourne.

Following the 1979 attack on the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, 52 Americans were held hostage for 444 days. Six other embassy staffers were sheltered by the Canadian ambassador. Their escape, using a fake movie as a cover story, is recounted in "Argo."

Iranian officials dismissed "Argo" as pro-CIA, anti-Iran propaganda.

Well ... yeah.

According to Entertainment Weekly, though the movie isn't showing in Iranian theaters, many Iranians have seen bootleg DVDs and have started a debate exposing a generational divide. Obviously, people who took part in the 1979 Islamic Revolution don't like the portrayals of Tehran at the time. Younger people are reportedly eager for a different view on what had happened.

The decision to sue came after a group of Iranian cultural officials and movie critics screened the film in a closed audience in a Tehran theater late Monday.

I'm guessing they didn't applaud at the end.

Members of the gathering, titled "The Hoax of Hollywood" (at least they went into it with an open mind) discussed legal aspects of filing a lawsuit, according to media reports. It remains unclear what specific charges Iran could raise and what court Tehran could turn to if the action goes ahead. A statement issued after the gathering said that "awarding an anti-Iran movie is a propaganda attack against our nation and entire humanity."

Speaking of drama ... .

The statement didn't specify how the film was unrealistic. Officials have accused "Argo" of depicting Iranians as "too violent." They said the movie didn't get into background events that led to the crisis.

This isn't the first time Iran has given the U.S. a collective thumbs-down to one of its films.

In 2009, Iran demanded an apology from visiting Hollywood actors and movie industry officials, including Annette Bening, claiming films such as "300" and "The Wrestler" were "insulting" to Iranians.

The 1991 film "Not Without My Daughter" -- based on the true story of an American women fleeing Iran with her young daughter -- angered Iranians who said it cast Iranians as dirty, boorish and cruel, obsessed with Islam and misogynist attitudes toward women.

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