MOUNTAIN VIEW -- The Federal Trade Commission is expected to announce the results of its long antitrust investigation into search giant Google (GOOG) at 10 a.m. Pacific time Thursday.

The announcement follows nearly 18 months of investigation by federal authorities and vociferous complaints from Google's competitors, who had urged the FTC to file an antitrust lawsuit against Google over allegations that the Mountain View company was unfairly favoring its own online services over those of its rivals when displaying search results.

But in recent weeks, reports from Washington indicated that the FTC concluded the evidence didn't prove consumers were harmed by Google's search practices. That left the commission to focus on secondary issues that had been raised during the course of its review.

Instead of a lawsuit or consent decree, which would be legally binding, the agency was expected to announce a voluntary agreement under which Google would change the way it presents content from other sites, such as restaurant reviews from sites such as Yelp, which has complained in the past that Google unfairly "scraped" and used Yelp's content. Google is also expected to make some voluntary changes in its advertising procedures that will make it easier for advertisers who want to transfer their messages to rival search services such as Microsoft's Bing.

On a separate matter, the FTC was expected to announce that it has reached a consent decree related to Google's use of mobile technology patents that it acquired when it bought Motorola Mobility last year. According to recent news reports, the order will require Google to grant licenses, at a reasonable price, for others to use some technology that is considered "standard essential" for mobile devices and it will limit Google's ability to seek injunctions against competitors' products.