Fairfax's own Vivienne Harr rang the bell at the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday morning as Twitter went public, drawing nationwide attention to her lemonade company and its mission to end child slavery.

Dressed in a fluffy blue dress that paid homage to Twitter's blue bird logo, Harr, 9, excitedly rang the bell alongside actor Patrick Stewart and Cheryl Fiandaca of the Boston Police Department. She was picked from among 200 million active Twitter users, celebrities, heads of state and humanitarian organizations to mark the occasion.

Vivienne said she enjoyed the experience and thought it was "cool."

"Ringing the bell was very fun, I liked it a lot," she said in a phone interview. "Today I rang the bell for freedom, and you don't have to be big and powerful to make a difference — you can be like me."

Vivienne's journey to the top started in 2012 when she began selling her homemade Make A Stand Lemon-Aid, which is an all-organic, fair-trade lemonade sweetened with agave nectar, on street corners to raise money for organizations that fight modern-day slavery around the world. After raising more than $500,000 with her stand and its online equivalent, www.makeastand.com, she began bottling the beverage in July.

The proceeds from the drink go to Free the Slaves, Not For Sale, the Nepal Youth Foundation, the International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labor and GEMS: Girls Educational and Mentoring Services.

More than 150 stores and even Twitter's headquarters carry the social change beverage. Vivienne said it's exciting to know that her stock exchange appearance and affiliation with Twitter could help boost sales.

"I love that more people know about us," she said.

Twitter co-founder Biz Stone holds a letter given to him by Vivienne Harr, a girl who sells lemonade in the name of ending slavery across the globe, as he
Twitter co-founder Biz Stone holds a letter given to him by Vivienne Harr, a girl who sells lemonade in the name of ending slavery across the globe, as he waits for her and others to ring the opening bell of the New York Stock Exchange, for the Twitter IPO, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. If Twitter's bankers and executives were hoping for a surge on the day of the stock's public debut, they got it. The stock opened at $45.10 a share on its first day of trading, 73 percent above its initial offering price. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Twitter co-founder Biz Stone, who lives in Corte Madera, was on hand Thursday as the social networking company's stock sold for $44.90 a share at Wall Street's closing —

72.7 percent higher than the initial public offering price.

The social network sold at least 70 million shares at $26 apiece Wednesday evening, but shares soared to $45.10 in the initial trade Thursday morning. The price moved higher than $50 briefly in the first 10 minutes of trading, hitting a high of $50.09, and shares sold for no lower than $44 before closing at $44.90. At its closing price, Twitter had a market capitalization of $24.5 billion.

Bureau Chief of Public Information for the Boston Police Department Cheryl Fiandaca, left,  Cheryl Fiandaca, a girl who sells lemonade  in the name of
Bureau Chief of Public Information for the Boston Police Department Cheryl Fiandaca, left, Cheryl Fiandaca, a girl who sells lemonade in the name of ending slavery across the globe, NYSE Executive Vice President Scott Cutler, and actor Sir Patrick Stewart, right, applaud the New York Stock Exchange opening bell is rung for the Twitter IPO, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. If Twitter's bankers and executives were hoping for a surge on the day of the stock's public debut, they got it. The stock opened at $45.10 a share on its first day of trading, 73 percent above its initial offering price. (AP Photo/Ben Hider, NYSE) ( Ben Hider )

Vivienne's father, Eric Harr, also attended the stock exchange event and watched his daughter flash peace signs with her hands after she rang the bell. He said the appearance, which garnered massive media attention, could make a big difference for the company.

"We're now raising investment funds to grow her company. This is our moment," Harr said.

Harr, who has left his digital marketing job to help oversee the lemonade company's growth, has supported Vivienne's dream and helped her grow the brand by teaching her to use Twitter. People can follow her @vivienneharr and the company @makeastandinc on Twitter. The former fourth-grader at Cascade Canyon School, who is now being home-schooled, has more than 22,800 followers.

Harr said it's amazing what his young daughter, who couldn't wait to go to the American Girl doll store after ringing the bell, is accomplishing.

"It's not improbable that we can end child slavery. It feels within reach now," he said.

Contact Megan Hansen via email at mhansen@marinij.com or via Twitter at http://twitter.com/hansenmegan. Follow her blog at http://blogs.marinij.com/bureaucratsandbaking. The San Jose Mercury News contributed to this report.