Former Cal star Allen Crabbe apparently will get what he sought from Thursday night's NBA draft.

"He'll be a first-rounder," Cal coach Mike Montgomery said.

What happens beyond that, nobody knows, including Crabbe.

"It's been my dream my entire life to play in the NBA. I'm just worried about getting myself there," said Crabbe, who will attend the draft at the Barclay Center in Brooklyn. "It's not like college -- you can't choose a team you want to go to."

Crabbe said he's not nervous about his right foot, in which he developed tendinitis during workouts a couple of weeks ago at New York and Brooklyn, causing him to cancel several team visits. But he made stops this week at Milwaukee and Brooklyn.

California’s Allen Crabbe (23) celebrates a score against Southern California during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Sunday, Feb.
California's Allen Crabbe (23) celebrates a score against Southern California during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, Sunday, Feb. 17, 2013, in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

"It's definitely a lot better," Crabbe said of his foot.

The Warriors won't be Crabbe's destination -- barring a last-minute deal, Golden State does not have a pick in the two-round draft.

In a draft class widely regarded as mediocre, there is considerable depth at shooting guard, Crabbe's position. A recent mock draft by NBAdraft.net projected that nine shooting guards and two combo guards would be taken in the first round.

"It's a pretty strong draft for guards," said Scotty Stirling, an NBA talent evaluator for more than 30 years, most recently with the Sacramento Kings.

The top prospects at the position are Victor Oladipo of Indiana and Ben McLemore of Kansas. After that, there is less consensus.

Shabazz Muhammad is considered a mid-first round pick after one season at UCLA. Crabbe, the Pac-12 Player of the Year, is projected 25th to the Los Angeles Clippers by NBAdraft.net and 27th to the Denver Nuggets by Draftexpress.com.

Stirling said Crabbe's game will translate well to the NBA, especially if he continues to develop his ability to attack the basket off the dribble.

"He's going to be much better up here," Stirling said. "He's pretty good defensively, and he's not reluctant to pass. He might be very good right now (as a perimeter shooter) without being great. He'll get better."

At 6-foot-6, Crabbe was known primarily as a catch-and-shoot player when he arrived in Berkeley three years ago. Opponents built their game plans around driving him off the 3-point line, and Crabbe responded by adding a midrange game.

He knows he still isn't a great finisher at the rim, but that has been his focus since declaring for the draft after his junior season. Crabbe has worked since early April with A.J. Diggs, a former Cal guard and now a basketball trainer affiliated with Crabbe's agent, Sam Goldfeder.

Crabbe said he worked with Diggs five times a week to improve his conditioning as well as his ballhandling skills and effectiveness off the pick-and-roll.

"We wanted to try to add some pieces to his game," Diggs said.

"I showed people some things they probably didn't think I could do," Crabbe said.

  • Three other local players unlikely to be drafted but viewed as possible free-agent signings are Saint Mary's point guard Matthew Dellavedova, the 2012 West Coast Conference Player of the Year; Santa Clara guard Kevin Foster, the all-time Bay Area scoring leader; and Montana guard Will Cherry, formerly of McClymonds High in Oakland.