Visitors to the historic Grauman's Chinese Theatre are getting a little extra for their tour or movie ticket price.

For the foreseeable future, iconic costumes from the vast Hollywood Legends Collection are on rotating display in the lobby.

Among the 10 dresses and gowns currently on view are the trend-setting white strapless dress Elizabeth Taylor wore in "A Place in the Sun" (1951), Marlene Dietrich's black velvet gown and iridescent feather boa from Josef von Sternberg's "Shanghai Express" (1932) and the Mexican dancing dress in which Linda Darnell tamed the West in John Ford's "My Darling Clementine" (1946).

The collection includes landmark designs by the likes of Edith Head and Adrian - whose "Wizard of Oz" blue check pinafore just cycled out of the Hollywood Boulevard display.

There's a lot more to go around. The whole collection consists of some 887 movie costumes, more than 115,000 photos, scads of posters, lobby cards and props (some of Elizabeth Taylor's "Cleopatra" jewelry and two "Ten Commandments" tablets are also on display at the Chinese Theatre).

And if you've got $10 million handy, it can all be yours.

"We hope to sell it all in one lot, to keep it together for generations to come," said Joyce Aimee, a retired talent agent and still active chanteuse who owns about 20 percent of the items.

"There's no collection that I know of that's as complete as this, starting with Mary Pickford back in the silents and going up to `The Terminator' in the 1980s."

The majority of the pieces are owned by John LeBold. A former Hollywood dresser and assistant to Edith Head for many years, he started collecting movie memorabilia during his childhood in New York. After hitting Hollywood, he took to rescuing items - such as Humphrey Bogart's "Casablanca" trenchcoat - that the studios would just toss after filming. He met Aimee many years later at an auction of Hollywood stuff, and their mutual friendship/obsession has continued through the decades.

Now in frail health and living on Cape Cod, Mass., LeBold wants proceeds from the sale to go to the Giving Back Fund, Aimee's Americana Dance Theatre and, upon his death, assorted other charities.

Anything but frail at the age of 81, Hollywood Hills-based Aimee could not be more enthusiastic about showing the stuff off to the public.

"One thing about John's collection - which I cannot say for every collection - is everything looks absolutely like it just came out of the box," she said.

Visitors on the theater tour Wednesday were duly impressed.

"It's really unique because it's all these old costumes," observed 14-year-old Katherine Consola, who was there with her family from Sherman Oaks. "I don't know any of the movies they have here, but the costumes are really cool."

"It's phenomenal," marveled Michelle Myers, a London-based South African on her first holiday in Hollywood. "These are the original outfits that they wore in the movies and it's beautiful, it really adds to the experience. I was extremely interested in the Elizabeth Taylor dress. I've seen `A Place in the Sun' many times."

Chris Borden, one of Grauman's managers, explained that this was the first historical display of its kind staged inside the theater, whose cement forecourt with the hands and footprints of stars has drawn tourists for most of its 85-year existence.

"People are just blown away when they come in here and see these costumes," Borden said. "It's a lot to look at, it's a lot to take in. For younger kids, it's a chance to learn a little bit about movie history. For the old folks, some of them see these costumes and they gasp; they remember seeing some of these costumes on the screen."

Select costumes will be on display until the collection is sold. To see more, go to www.hollywood legendscollection.org. Tours of Grauman's are $13.50 for adults, $6.50 for children and $11.50 for seniors.

bob.strauss@dailynews.com, 818-713-3670