This Marion County Sheriff handout photo taken Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Salem, Ore., shows  Kevin Dean Parrish.  Parrish admitted to deputies that he lost
This Marion County Sheriff handout photo taken Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Salem, Ore., shows Kevin Dean Parrish. Parrish admitted to deputies that he lost control with 9-pound Chihuahua-Pincher "Kudo" , grabbed the dog and started punching it in the head with his fist, tried to strangle the dog and then put him in an oven he had pre-heated to 350 degrees for his lunch. Parrish was arrested and booked at the Marion County Jail in Salem, Ore., on one count of Aggravated Abuse 1.(AP Photo/Marion County Sheriff, ho) (Anonymous)

SALEM, Ore. - Deputies say a 20-year-old Oregon man was preparing to heat his enchilada lunch in a 350-degree oven, but when his grandmother's dog nipped him, the animal went in instead.

Kevin Dean Parrish of Lyons, southeast of Salem, was arraigned Tuesday on a charge of first-degree aggravated animal abuse, Marion County sheriff's spokesman Don Thomson said.

Parrish's bail was increased to $100,000, from $10,000. His next court appearance is scheduled Jan. 30.

The dog, a Chihuahua-miniature pincher mix named Kudo, was cut and bruised, his hair was singed and three of his legs were burned, Thomson said.

The 6-year-old dog had difficulty standing but was expected to pull through.

Parrish had been caring for the 9-pound animal while his grandmother was out of state.

According to a police report, Parrish told deputies he was about to put lunch into the oven on Friday when he stopped to check on the dog. When he reached into a kennel, he said the dog bit him on the hand.

Thomson said Parrish, who told investigators he had "anger issues," punched the dog in the head several times and tried to strangle it.

Remembering that the oven was hot, Parrish put the dog in, Thomson said.

Parrish said he pulled Kudo out after several minutes when he heard his brother coming into the house, the report stated.

Parrish's brother and father took the animal to a veterinarian.


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"As far as I know, he should make a full recovery," said Dr. Keri Sanders, who treated Kudo.