Christopher Dorner sees himself as a crusader, a 6-foot, 270-pound whistle-blower who confronted racism early in life and believes he suffered in his career and personal life for challenging injustices from bigotry to dishonesty.

He fulfilled his lifelong dream of becoming a Los Angeles cop in 2005 but saw it unravel three years later when he was fired after a police review board decided he falsely accused his training officer of kicking a mentally ill man in the face and chest. The incident led Dorner to plot violent revenge against those he believed responsible for his downfall, according to a 14-page manifesto police believe he authored because there are details in it only he would know.

Police say Dorner began carrying out that plot last weekend when he killed a woman whose father had represented him as he fought to keep his job. On Thursday -- the eighth anniversary of his first day on the job with the LAPD -- Dorner ambushed two officers, killing one, authorities said.

Also killed was the woman's fiance, whose body was found along with hers in a parked car near the recently engaged couple's condominium.

"I know most of you who personally know me are in disbelief to hear from media reports that I am suspected of committing such horrendous murders and have taken drastic and shocking actions in the last couple of days," the manifesto reads.

Dorner has no children, and court records show his wife filed for divorce in 2007, though there's no evidence one was granted. David Pighin, a neighbor of Dorner in the Orange County community of La Palma, believed Dorner lived with his mother and possibly his sister. The 33-year-old Dorner graduated in 2001 from Southern Utah University in Cedar City, Utah, school officials said, where he majored in political science and had an unremarkable career as a reserve running back on the football team.

In addition to police work, Dorner served in the Naval Reserves, earning a rifle marksman ribbon and pistol expert medal. He served in a naval undersea warfare unit and various aviation training units, according to military records, and took a leave from the LAPD and deployed to Bahrain in 2006 and 2007.

His last day with the Navy was Friday.

"I will utilize every bit of small arms training, demolition, ordinance and survival training I've been given," the manifesto reads. "You have misjudged a sleeping giant."

The manifesto included some 40 targets and warned that their families will be harmed. "I never had the opportunity to have a family of my own. I'm terminating yours," the manifesto says.

In the document, Dorner rails against the hypocrisy of black police commanders who crack down on their white subordinates and catalogs his experiences with racism and injustice, beginning with a schoolyard fight at his Christian elementary school and ending with the disciplinary process that led to his dismissal from the LAPD in 2008.

Dorner graduated and served for only four months in the field before being deployed to the Middle East in 2006 and 2007. When he returned, he was assigned to a training officer, Sgt. Teresa Evans, who became increasingly alarmed at his conduct, according to a summary of an interview with Evans in Dorner's disciplinary file.

On Aug. 4, 2008, Evans warned Dorner that she would give him an unsatisfactory rating and request that he be removed from the field unless he improved. Six days later, Dorner reported to internal affairs that in the course of an arrest Evans had kicked a severely mentally ill man in the chest and left cheek. His report came two weeks after the arrest, police and court records allege.