The familiar forest of white crosses memorializing troops killed in Iraq and Afghanistan above the BART station will grow no larger, its keepers say.

Organizers of the Lafayette crosses memorial say they will stop adding the crosses, Stars of David and Islamic crescents because they're running out of space and the memorial is becoming increasingly difficult for the dozen or so core volunteers to maintain, said organizer Baika Pratt.

"It's definitely not that we're losing courage, it's just that it's not logistically possible to put any more in there," she said.

The volunteers will continue to repaint and repair the approximately 4,800 white markers dotting the hillside, and they will keep updating the sign that shows the number of troops killed in the two wars.

They are also looking into building a permanent memorial on the site, Pratt said, but must first get permission from property owner Louise Clark.

The display ignited debate soon after Jeff Heaton began setting crosses into the hill on Veterans Day 2006. The memorial attracted pro- and anti-war demonstrators and was vandalized several times. Opponents called it a political statement that insulted families of fallen soldiers. Supporters said it was a stark reminder of the cost of war.

But as the controversy over the wars has waned, so, too, has the furor over the crosses.

"We used to get a lot of people who (would) come by and shake their fist or yell obscenities, but that doesn't happen anymore," Pratt said.

"The feeling generally out there is that people accept it and appreciate it being there for its message and its inclusiveness."

Contact Jonathan Morales at 925-943-8048. Follow him at Twitter.com/sosaysjonathan.