Adult film performers gather on Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012 at the DejaVu strip club in North Hollywood to show their opposition to L.A.’s Measure B on the
Adult film performers gather on Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012 at the DejaVu strip club in North Hollywood to show their opposition to L.A.'s Measure B on the Nov. 6 ballot. The measure would require the use of condoms when filming sex scenes in adult movies. (Gene Blevins/Special to the Daily News)

Los Angeles County residents voted Tuesday to require the use of condoms in pornographic films.

Measure B, which was OK'd by more than 55 percent of voters, also will require the county Department of Public Health to lead inspections and enforcement efforts.

Public health advocates said the measure promotes public health and the safety of actors.

Opponents, including those who work in the industry, said it could chase jobs and millions of dollars out of the San Fernando Valley, famed as the nation's porn capital.

That's because customers don't like films with condoms, they said.

Condom use on porn sets already is required under state and city laws. But those are rarely enforced, with state prosecutions based only on complaints.

The prospect of a more active government role worried some in the porn industry.

"The idea of allowing a government employee to come and examine our genitalia while we're on set is atrocious," Amber Lynn, a longtime adult film actress, said at an anti-Measure B rally Sunday in North Hollywood.

She and other actors defended the porn industry's voluntary guidelines, under which actors are tested at least monthly for HIV, gonorrhea and chlamydia.

Opponents also called the measure a restriction on free expression.

The Valley Industry and Commerce Association, along with more than a dozen other chambers of commerce, opposed measure B. So did the Canoga Park-based Free Speech Coalition, which represents the adult-film industry.


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The measure's primary supporter was Michael Weinstein, executive director of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, which reported spending more than $1.6 million on the effort, according to October figures released by the county registrar.

"If it passes, it's going to reduce the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases in our community at no cost to taxpayers," Weinstein said last month.

On the other side, the No on Government Waste campaign had raised almost $120,000 as of the end of September.

Opponents mocked the idea of government inspectors standing on porn sets and said taxpayers likely will end up footing the bill for them, despite the promises.

Measure B requires producers to undergo training on blood-borne pathogens and submit an "exposure control plan," then pay for a public health permit.

Permit fees will be used to pay for enforcement.

Violators could face civil fines and criminal charges, and the Department of Public Health will be able to revoke the public health permits if it finds violations or a risk to public safety.