Stranger registered to vote at our address

Tuesday morning, my husband and I went to vote and discovered that a "John H. Mifflin" was registered to vote at our address. Mr. Mifflin has been registered to vote at our house before; we have never met him, and I am sure if he lived here, we would have encountered each other.

We called the registrar of voters a few weeks before the election to check that no imaginary voters were registered at our address. We were assured that only my husband and I were registered.

Imagine our surprise when we saw the mythical Mr. Mifflin registered again. I checked online, I could find no "John H. Mifflin" in Newark.

It seems voter fraud is not an issue in California; I spoke with someone at the Alameda County District Attorney's Office who informed me that they don't get involved with the issue.

Nadja Adolf

Newark

Clear case in point to toughen disclosure

It took an emergency California Supreme Court ruling to reveal that the $11 million in secret campaign money spent for Proposition 32 and against Proposition 30 came from an obscure Arizona nonprofit that was actually laundered from other nonprofits associated with the Koch brothers.

It's more than ironic that the hidden funding by secret supporters of Proposition 32 paid for ads that falsely claimed it was a campaign reform act, when it was really a lethal attack to destroy a political party.

This deception illustrates how badly we need to strengthen our disclosure laws and make sure that political ads have to show, clearly and prominently on the ads themselves, exactly who really pays for them.

The California Disclose Act, which will be introduced next year with the support of real reform organizations like the California Clean Money Campaign, California Common Cause and the League of Women Voters of California, is carefully written to let voters see, in real time, where the money is coming from.

Joe Ely

Pleasanton

Romney now knows the pain of loss

It hurt a little when Mitt Romney came to Fremont for the sole purpose to remind us of Solyndra's failure and how our government spent half a billion dollars toward it.

Romney and his supporters spent half a billion dollars on his campaign, and that wasn't much of a success either. It hurts a little, doesn't it, Mitt?

C.J. Jones

Fremont

We can no longer overlook NIF failure

At Livermore Lab's National Ignition Facility, the countdown went: 3, 2, 1 ignition (not), and maybe never. The date set for NIF ignition was Sept. 30. It didn't happen, continuing a series of missed ignition deadlines.

Now, some lab scientists are saying maybe by 2015 ignition can be achieved. Other scientists say ignition at NIF is unlikely no matter how much time and money is thrown at the project.

There have been more than 1,000 experiments at NIF and, still, no ignition. Not even close. If you count the money for NIF construction and related research and development, so far $8 billion tax dollars have been squandered.

An Oct. 6 New York Times editorial notes "experiments conducted so far have made it clear that the scientists in charge do not fully understand how the process is working. Congress will need to look hard at whether the (NIF) project should be continued, or scrapped, or slowed to help reduce federal spending."

NIF's operating cost exceeds $300 million a year. Can we afford to continue funding failure?

Jo Ann Frisch

Livermore

Obama is president for all Americans

Did you catch the television coverage of President Barack Obama surveying the aftermath of superstorm Sandy in New Jersey with Gov. Chris Christie?

Did you see the president hugging a distraught woman, trying to console and reassure her? Did you see the expression of concern and compassion on his face?

Through viewers' eyes, it looks like an African-American politician comforting an upset middle-aged, middle-class white woman -- an interracial moment. Through Obama's eyes, this sobbing woman looks like his white mother or his white grandmother -- a deeply moving personal moment.

Obama is not a black president or a white president. He is our president.

Joy Goto-Aaronson

Berkeley