A Royal cousin has come out and slammed the late Princess Diana, reports Vanity Fair.

Lady Pamela Hicks, who is prince Philip's first cousin and was a bridesmaid of Queen Elizabeth in 1947, was promoting her new memoir "Daughter of Empire: Life as a Mountbatten." According to Us Weekly, Hicks told the magazine that Prince William and Harry's late, beloved mother was "really spiteful" to husband Prince Charles and to much of the royal family.

"She had enormous charisma, she was beautiful, she was very good at empathy with the general crowd," Hicks said of Diana, who died at age 36 in a 1997 car crash in Paris. "(But) she had no feeling at all for her husband or his family. Quite the reverse!"

Princess Diana (L), Prince Harry, (C) and Prince William (R) gather for the commemorations of VJ Day, 19 August 1995, in London.
Princess Diana (L), Prince Harry, (C) and Prince William (R) gather for the commemorations of VJ Day, 19 August 1995, in London. (JOHNNY EGGITT/AFP/Getty Images)

Wow -- that's kind of mean. Must come with the last name.

Hicks said "She was really spiteful, really unkind to (Charles) and, my God, he's a man who needs support and encouragement."

Right. I mean, he barely worked up the courage to cheat on Diana.

Diana and Charles, now 64, divorced in 1996 after 15 years. "(The marriage) absolutely destroyed him. He looked gray and ghost-like," Hicks said. "Now, of course, he's blossomed again."

What is he ... a 16-year-old girl?

Lady Pamela, whose daughter India Hicks was a bridesmaid at Charles and Diana's wedding, also said "She made everybody believe she'd been thrown to the wolves. Such nonsense! She was given the Queen's favorite lady-in-waiting, Sue Hussey, to help her, to teach her. But she didn't want to be told anything ... Instead, she wanted to listen to her music and go disco-ing or to some jive concert."


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Right. You know those kids, with that jazzy jive jump-around music they listen to on the wireless, with the out-of-sight beats played by cool cats on the skins and Big Daddies blowing licorice sticks with all the cool licks.

"She didn't try," Hicks said. "She had no need to try because she saw the people admired her, then they admired her more. She reckoned she was the star."

Well, at least she went public when Diana was still around to defend herself. Oh ... wait.

Contact Tony Hicks at Facebook.com/BayAreaNewsGroup.TonyHicks or Twitter.com/insertfoot.