ANTIOCH -- Deer Valley High quarterback Nsimba Webster decided to do what he's always done -- stick with his twin brother, Nzuzi.

The Wolverines' dazzling signal-caller ended the speculation by signing with Eastern Washington on Wednesday at a National Signing Day ceremony at the school.

Nzuzi Webster also signed with the Eagles, an NCAA Football Championship Subdivision power. The Wolverines' Robert Taylor signed with UC Davis.

"It was the right fit for me because I can't stay away from my brother, I guess," Nsimba said with a laugh before posing with Nzuzi and his mom, Batala.

Opinions had swirled about where Nsimba, an electrifying multisport athlete, would land as signing day approached.

Nsimba said he turned down San Jose State because the Spartans wanted him to grayshirt and didn't make an offer to Nzuzi. In a late twist, the twins took a trip to UCLA, which had also been making a push for Freedom star Joe Mixon, the twins' friend.

"We just went there to see what they had to offer," Nzuzi said of the UCLA trip. "They were saying they were going to give us a ride, but I had to stick with what I felt was right."

Nsimba said he knew in his "heart" what to do in the end, even though he had plenty of advisers.

"Everybody was like 'Go here, go there, go here, go there,' but I made my decision this morning," Nsimba Webster said. "I'm 100 percent with it. It was great to me. I love it."


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Nsimba, who was recruited as a wide receiver, felt comfortable during his trip to Eastern Washington, which announced the signing of 26 high school players on Wednesday.

"The players, the coaches, they made me feel right at home, like a lot of love," Nsimba said. "It feels like a family out there, a big family. It was the right fit for me for the next four to five years of my life."

Even still, Nsimba's final call was a cliffhanger, even in the twins' inner circle.

"He wasn't telling me where he was going: 'Are you going or not? You better tell me," Nzuzi said. "But it's good to know that he's coming with me."

Blessed with devastating quickness, Nsimba is coming off a brilliant varsity football career. As a senior, he passed for 2,026 yards and 22 touchdowns with only four interceptions. He also ran for 1,544 yards and 28 touchdowns, averaging 10 yards a carry.

Nzuzi says his brother plays just like Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III, aka "RGIII."

"He's got the big-play capability," Nzuzi said. "He's just a playmaker. He makes something out of nothing. He's a great player and I'm glad to say he's my twin brother."

Recruited as a safety, Nzuzi started on offense and defense. He finished with 181 tackles, 12 interceptions and 24 passes broken up in his career. The Websters are following in the footsteps of ex-Deer Valley star Taiwan Jones, now with the Oakland Raiders.

"They are similar in a lot of ways," Eastern Washington coach Beau Baldwin said in a school release. "Both are incredible football players, along with having great character and high motors."

For those who follow Deer Valley sports, it probably seems natural the twins would team up again in college, albeit on opposite sides of the ball. The twins are both listed as 6-foot and 185 pounds on the Wolverines' roster.

"It feels great having another four years with my brother. We make great things happen," Nzuzi said. "I just want to keep it going, create some things up there at the next level."

The explosive Wolverines football team, led by Nsimba, advanced to the North Coast Section Division I semifinals, amassing 143 points in three playoff games.

Taylor, who will play defensive back and special teams at Davis, also took part on Wednesday's signing event at Deer Valley. The school also produced Marcus Lee, now a freshman basketball player at Kentucky.

Taylor said he picked Davis because it was a "great fit" for him and his family.

"I went down Junior Day and got the feel for it. I talked to coach (Ron) Gould and all the staff up there. It was just the best choice for me education-wise and for what I want to do in the future if I don't get a chance to play in the NFL."