DUBLIN -- This fast-growing city will develop a third dog park as part of a future community park in eastern Dublin.

The City Council on Tuesday gave initial approval for a 2-acre dog park as a feature of the 18-acre Jordan Ranch Community Park east of Fallon Road and south of Central Parkway.

Many details of the $1.1 million dog park remain to be worked out -- including when it will be built and open. Opening could be years away, because the city plans to pay for it with developer fees, which are paid as homes are built.

The council, however, put the project on track late Tuesday night by unanimously endorsing the park and instructing city staffers to plan for it.

Rebecca Maher, of Dublin, tosses a ball for her dog at the Dougherty Hills Dog Park in Dublin, Calif., on Friday, Jan. 25, 2013. (Doug Duran/Staff)
Rebecca Maher, of Dublin, tosses a ball for her dog at the Dougherty Hills Dog Park in Dublin, Calif., on Friday, Jan. 25, 2013. (Doug Duran/Staff)

"We support a new dog park at the Jordan Ranch Community Park," said Dublin Mayor Tim Sbranti.

Dublin already has the nearly 2-acre Dougherty Hills Dog Park and a quarter-acre park limited to small dogs at the Bray Commons Park.

Residents want more, however, especially in the fast-growing eastern side of the city.

In an online survey by Dublin earlier this year, 55 percent of 602 respondents said they want a new dog park, while 45 percent opposed it, according to a report.

City staffers said the opposition came mainly from residents who place a higher priority on spending for other recreation amenities such as hiking and biking trails, lighted sports fields and protected open space.

Sbranti said he believes those in the 55 percent of park supporters are passionate about their desire for a new fenced-in park for dogs to play off leash.

City staffers and the city's recreation and community services commission recommended the future Jordan Ranch Community Park site because it's near open space and largely away from residential areas.

And because the park site is now empty, the community park and the dog park within it can be planned from scratch.

"We have a blank slate," said city spokeswoman Jacqui Diaz, "and an opportunity to work with the public on designing the park."

In the online survey, Dublin residents strongly favor having separate areas for small and big dogs, as many dog parks have.

Councilman Kevin Hart wants the city to investigate a variety of dog park surfaces, because some all-grass parks are vulnerable to long closures during reseeding of damaged turf areas.

Contact Denis Cuff at 925-943-8267. Follow him at Twitter.com/deniscuff.