Desert home for inmates?

Dear Editor:

I have a better idea! Move the "surplus prisoners" out to the desert where they can be securely housed in barracks or tents.

The last thing this Golden State needs is 10,000 persons who deserved punishment and sentencing, free to roam about and possibly cause more mayhem.

Desert confinement could also be a crime deterrent; life there would

certainly be less "comfortable" than present prison accommodations.

Desert heat, insects, less air conditioning, limited relaxation, and

less TV and technology for these prisoners might me a good remedy.

During their terms of punishment for whatever they committed, do they truly deserve all the "comforts of home?" Thinking twice or thrice before committing another crime or lawbreaking

could lower the number of prisoners and cost of housing those 10,000 or more law unabiders.

Elisabeth Pforr

Brentwood

Remember U.S. is a melting pot

Dear Editor:

Easy on Immigrants, for you or your parents or grandparents were once immigrants, too.

Immigration is not a negative topic to discuss. The

melting pot of the USA reminds us that we are a diverse population of

citizens.

RUBIO 1225 is an amendment that would require that undocumented persons learn English before adjustment to permanent resident status. This would be a very difficult requirement that does not compel good

citizenship. If you have learned a foreign language, or a friend has

learned one, then you realize how unfair this requirement is. Other

legislation is under revision that does not help immigrants and their

families, too. The Bible says to be kind to the stranger or alien.

I am calling upon the kindness of others on immigration issues. A

kinder heart will make a difference in our reputation abroad. Hostility

does not seem right, does it? May we raise a united voice for every

trial withstood, one Nation, under God, with liberty and justice for

all!

Susan Cu Tikalsky

Brentwood

High rates of illegal tobacco

Dear Editor:

Pittsburg and Antioch are tied for the highest rates of illegal tobacco

sales minors in the County, but Antioch is the only one doing anything about it.

The Antioch City Council just voted to put a temporary hold on

approving any new tobacco sellers while they look at problems related to stores selling tobacco. As a parent with kids in the Pittsburg school system, I want to see Pittsburg do something too.

More than 90 other communities in California have something called Tobacco Retailer Licensing (TRL) to get tobacco sales to minors down. With a TRL, any business that wants to sell tobacco has to buy a local license from the city. That money is spent to fund police stings to see if stores are following the law. If they break the law, the store can have their license suspended.

Unincorporated Contra Costa has a law like this and its sales to minors rate dropped from 37 percent to under 4 percent. There are

several stores next to Pittsburg High and feel something should be done to protect our children. I see kids smoking all the time by these

stores early morning time and afternoon time when school is let out.

What can be done about this?

Wendy Jo Escamilla

Pittsburg

Column hit right note

Dear Editor:

What a well-written piece by columnist Estehr J. Cepeda on educating Hispanic kids. She has captured a key component to their success in

school-parental involvement.

What also jumps out to me is her use of the term "eighth-grade promotion ceremony." Too often, schools use "graduation ceremony" from kindergarten to first or fifth to middle school. There is only one

graduation and that is from high school in the K-12 curriculum.

The other so-called graduation ceremonies give some parents and students a false idea that school life is over, especially for the middle-

schoolers. The attendance laws indicate that 18 years (or high school

diploma) is the legal age wherein students can stop K-12 schooling.

Some do take an early graduation test (approved by a parent), but it

measures if that individual has achieved the required knowledge of a

12th-grader.

Richard Asadoorian

Antioch

Addicts, the decline of society?

Dear Editor:

Addicts, you know the ones that ruin society? You know, the ones that are going to be the decline of America?

Those addicts don't put needles in their arms.

Those addicts don't take pills.

Those addicts don't drink alcohol.

Those addicts need something else. Those addicts need money. They

can't get enough money. When they have more money than they or their descendants could ever need, they want more. When they hurt Americans by throwing them out onto the streets, it's because they want more money. When they make sure their products are made under slave labor conditions in Asia, Latin America and Africa, they do it because they want more money.

Do they have anything that they could possibly use -- not need or want -- use? I don't think so.

I don't want the freedom to make more money than one could ever imagine to be regulated or illegal. That would be un-American.

However, I want America to get better. I want the money addicts to seek help, get themselves cured. We all want this for addicts. If America is going to get better, the money addicts have to be cured, first and foremost.

Michael Bonanno

Antioch

Antioch council doesn't back police

Three members of the council voted against the Antioch Police Department and the good of Antioch as a whole.

Mayor Wade Harper ("Zero tolerance on crime"), Mary Rocha ("I'm so proud we have my people represented on the force") and Tony Tiscareno ("I want a strong police force and jobs") turned down a two and one half million dollar gift that would have funded the PD and code enforcement on top of paying its own way by providing set-aside money for salaries to implement the Rental Business License Fee.

Not only that, they voted 4-0 at the meeting just two weeks previously to approve the license fee. What were they thinking? Checkbooks of the Apartment Owners Association will donate handsomely to their campaign funds.

I guess in Antioch you say anything to get elected. The only chance we have now is a good alarm and a better gun. Thanks a lot to the three of you. I predict the half-cent sales tax will fail and we will become No. 1 in something in the Bay Area........CRIME.

Marty Fernandez

Antioch

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