A civil lawsuit against the Sequoia Union High School District over a hazing incident within the Woodside High School boys basketball program has been settled out of court.

A petition for settlement was filed Tuesday in San Mateo County Superior Court on behalf of N'Jai LeBlanc, the father of a victim in the incident that occurred the night of Dec. 27 at a hotel in the Central Valley town of Newton.

Chris Dolan, LeBlanc's attorney, said via email on Wednesday that a tentative settlement has been reached "without the district admitting liability, that would resolve all potential claims against the district and its coaches."

LeBlanc confirmed a deal has been struck.

Dolan's San Francisco firm filed a legal brief in the case in January, alleging assault and battery, bullying, harassment and discrimination.

Dolan did not provide details of the settlement, citing privacy concerns in a case involving a minor. He said the eventual disclosure of the petition will be left up to a yet undetermined San Mateo judge, who will have to approve the deal before it can be finalized.

"We have been working cooperatively with the district and their attorneys," Dolan wrote, "and hope to have this behind everyone soon so the boys can go back to their normal routine without having to look back at this difficult period in their lives."

LeBlanc's son was not the only alleged victim, but the civil suit lists only LeBlanc as petitioner.


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The hazing incident took place while the Woodside team was in Newton to play in a holiday tournament.

The accusations were described by Dolan in a Jan. 16 letter to Woodside principal Dianne Burbank and James Lianides, superintendent of the district that covers much of southern San Mateo County. That letter alleged that the player was mistreated by older members of the team. The claim says coach Daniel Fountain -- who was dismissed from his job along with an assistant coach in the aftermath of the incident -- called for a team meeting, at which time the player was duct taped to a chair and physically abused.

The complaint said the player screamed out for the coach, only to be told by his assailants that the coach would not help because "the coach picked you, he wanted us to do this to you."

It goes on to say Fountain came into the room after the assault and tore the tape off the player's mouth, asked what happened, and when told by the player the coach then said, "Do you know Spanish?" The player said he did not, then the coach said, "Well, you will watch Spanish TV for a couple of hours" and placed him in front of a TV turned to a Spanish network.

Eventually, the player was cut free by a teammate, the complaint letter says, after his clothing had been torn and cut, his watch and debit card had been taken and his neck chain had been broken.

LeBlanc, who runs MVP Sports Clinics, a youth basketball program with a motto of "MVP Morals, Values, and Principles," also sued the Redwood City School District in December of 2012. In that incident at Selby Lane School in Atherton his son, who is African-American and was 12 years old at the time, was allegedly called "my slave" by a school employee who instructed him to clean up garbage form the school's cafeteria floor. That case was settled out of court in January.

Email Greg Frazier at gfrazier@dailynewsgroup.com; follow him at Twitter.com/dailynewsgreg.