"Plans to make the Berkeley Country Club the finest course in America were outlined last night at a special meeting of the entire membership," the Berkeley Daily Gazette noted Oct. 21, 1937, seventy-five years ago.

"The greens will be put in first class condition, improvements will be made to the clubhouse and steps will be taken to make the social life of Berkeley center largely around the Berkeley Country Club."

An informal slogan was suggested, "We've got something here and we love it." The article noted that there were many women members of the club.

Lester W. Hink, one of Berkeley's leading businessmen, said "There isn't a club in America with a more ideal spot," adding, "We can accommodate at least 100 new members but we want to be 'choosey' and maintain the high type of membership we have maintained throughout these years."

The Club had been founded in the early 1920s. Today, it is the Mira Vista Country Club, in the El Cerrito hills north of Berkeley.

Community Chest

The 1938 Community Chest pledge drive was in full swing in October, 1937, and a half-page advertisement in the Oct. 30 Gazette made the case for contributing. "Twenty-three Berkeley Community Chest Agencies are constantly fighting our community battle against hunger and undernourishment, against disease, against crime and delinquency, making Berkeley a better place in which to live" the ad said.


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"As friendly citizens in a friendly city we cannot -- must not -- fail ... the time has come for us to prove our citizenship, to prove that Berkeley, like other enlightened American cities, can and will care for its own -- the needy, the unfortunate, the wayward youth dependent upon the Agencies for character guidance which builds a sound and honest citizenship."

The Chest emphasized pledges to be payable in 12 equal monthly installments during 1938. The goal was to raise $145,000.

Church anniversary

On Oct, 22, 1937, Bethany Lutheran Church on University Avenue began three days of celebration of the 25th anniversary of its founding.

"The Bethany Lutheran Church was organized by Dr. A. Kinell with 30 charter members, many of whom still worship at the church. Dr. Kinell was pastor for five years ... Following a fire in 1931 the church was rebuilt on a larger scale and it is now one of the most beautiful church edifices in the conference. The church also owns a fine parsonage", the Gazette reported.

Today, the church is still there at 1744 University Ave., but is now named the Lutheran Church of the Cross.

"Unstoppable" Bears

"The Power That is California -- Unstoppable?" headlined the sports section of the Gazette on Oct. 29, 1937.

"Massed thousands weekly watch the Golden Bears bowl over all opposition on their way to a Pacific Coast Conference championship and a game in the Rose Bowl."

The undefeated Golden Bear football team had just "humbled a powerful U.S.C. team" and would play UCLA, Washington, Oregon, and Stanford to round out the season.

"Unless overconfidence or injuries change the picture, the Bears should win them all handily."

New Exhibit

Drop by the Berkeley History Center Thursday to Saturday, 1 to 4 p.m., to see the new exhibit "Vanished," which opened two weeks ago.

Curated by Phil and Phyllis Gale, the exhibit recalls businesses and activities that have disappeared from Berkeley life, but are not quite forgotten.

The Haws Company (which invented the drinking fountain in Berkeley), and the early network of interurban streetcars and trains are featured.

There's a wall devoted to the Hink's Department Store, and community members are encouraged to let the historical society know if they have a piece of Hink's memorabilia; there's a search on for the oldest Hink's item.