racing toward me

images of wild geese

in the freezing wind

-- Jerry Ball, Walnut Creek

Dear Gary:

I was walking on my street in Danville the other day and noticed a lizard totally stuck in a glue trap on the sidewalk -- all four of its feet, tail, tummy, etc. Only its eyes were blinking.

I rushed it to Lindsay Wildlife Museum and they were able to unglue it, clean it and release it. Another wonderful plug for Lindsay; I hope people continue to donate to them for all the wondrous work that they do.

Lorna Lasky, Danville

Dear Lorna:

If you know anyone or any company that uses those nasty, diabolical, inhumane torture traps, please complain loudly.

I know of many other snakes, lizards, wild birds, frogs and at least one kitten that have been stuck in those fiendish contraptions.

Yes, thank God for Lindsay, especially for their help with local wildlife at times like this.

TIME MARCHES ON 2

Responses to my Sunday column about Tut the cat getting old:

  • It is so hard to see our beloved friends age. "Separate Lifetimes" is a favorite book, ever read it? I remember when you first started to write about Tut and how he would attack, run, race and jump. Now he is teaching you about aging. Our animal friends teach us all the way through.

    Chloe is now getting close to 18. She falls sometimes, but her eyes are bright and loving and she is patient with us as we try to help her. She reminds us when it is time for her meals and her favorite is ravioli, or any kind of pasta, and salmon if she can get it! She is very stylish in her red body support/harness with a handle on the back to help us help her when she needs it.

    My favorite picture is of Bill walking her, but Chloe is stretched out on the sidewalk, in the sun, "resting." Bill is holding the leash, looking a little perplexed. Hold Tut close and remember to wake him for dinner! (xxoo Susan, Walnut Creek)

  • I loved the column about Orlie, but I sure didn't want to read about Tut. Our last cat died when he was 16 and I suffered so much over it I swore I would never have another cat, even though my husband Gary wants one. I'm so sorry, Gary, that Tut is coming to the end of his days. It's awful to see a formerly vibrant animal (or person) lose the facilities and traits that once made them so special. I'm sure your kitty-loving readers join me in saying we do understand and will be grieving with you some time in the future. (Judie Howard, Moraga)

  • Coffee was hard to swallow when reading about Tut. Thank you for sharing your story about his aging. (SISULMOM, cyberspace)

  • Give Tut an extra hug for me. (Nona, Walnut Creek)

    Dear Gary:

    You should have told Diane from Danville that hawks have to eat too.

    1. Hawks are programmed to eat other animals. If not birds, it's rodents, frogs, and snakes.

    2. The hawk probably does a lot less damage to the songbird population than neighborhood cats.

    3. Doves are hardly an endangered species. And besides, dove hunters kill far more doves than hawks.

    4. Not many songbirds die of old age anyway. Between cats, hawks, owls, and people, a typical songbird is probably lucky to last five years.

    Diane is being too sentimental -- Mother Nature is not the Good Witch Glinda.

    TR, cyberspace

    Dear TR:

    Mother Nature is all things to all people.

    Diane knows that hawks have to eat, too. She just happens to care about her backyard bird friends. There's nothing wrong with being sentimental. Try it sometime. You might like it.

    Find more Gary in his blog at http://www.ibabuzz.com/garybogue; write Gary, P.O. Box 8099, Walnut Creek, CA 94596-8099; old columns at ContraCostaTimes.com, click on Columns; e-mail garybug@infionline.net.