Point's success is not magical

I'm boggled by Robert Rogers' irresponsible Point Richmond article.

Rogers seems to suggest that just because its residents are mostly white and have a higher median income, Point Richmond magically gained influence with the City Council.

You'd have readers believe that, with a snap of our manicured fingers or the tinkle of a silver bell, problems such as sewage odors, dirty parks, or crime magically disappear because politicians jump at our beck and call.

Rogers didn't mention hundreds of residents together, fighting an uphill battle against Veolia and City Hall for years, got a semi-crackdown on the treatment plant. He didn't mention that when we're out walking our "well-groomed dogs" we don't just step over trash, we pick it up. We scoop dog poop, ours and other people's.

Rogers didn't mention that we know who our neighbors are and immediately call the police when there's something suspicious and confront those committing crimes. When something happens, everyone in town knows about it and reports names, plates and descriptions.

Your article's a tail that wags the "well-groomed dog." Point Richmond doesn't have special privileges because there are wealthier-than-average Richmond residents living here. Point Richmond residents have worked hard for decades to make the Point a really nice place, and people with higher incomes have moved here because of that.

Edith Alderette

Richmond

Disagrees with proposed ban


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This letter is about Concord's proposed ordinance to ban growing medical marijuana outdoors.

I agree with those opposing the ban. People needing medical marijuana should have easy access to it, at a reasonable cost.

Medical marijuana is expensive and a fire hazard to grow indoors because of the cost of electricity and danger of grow lights. It's also expensive at the dispensaries. Growing it outside is the only reasonable cost option.

Growing outside is less dangerous to the growers. If someone wants to steal it, they can just hop the fence and steal a plant instead of breaking into the family's house.

The mayor called outdoor growth an attractive nuisance. Those who are for the ban have a problem with marijuana's smell and thieves who steal marijuana. A solution to the smell problem is growing less stinky varieties in greenhouses or limiting the number of people per caregiver per residence, which limits the total number of plants. As to theft problems, use a high fence.

Can growing medical marijuana be limited to one part of town or in a place away from other people? Can these options work?

Joshua Hughes

Pleasant Hill Joshua is a 14-year-old Boy Scout working on his communications merit badge.

Save historic post office

The U.S. Postal Service will hold a public hearing at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Berkeley City Council Chamber, Old City Hall, at 2134 Martin Luther King Jr. Way.

We must be there to be sure the USPS hears our views on its proposal to sell Berkeley's beautiful historic Main Post Office. Berkeley residents need this convenient downtown post office that was paid for by our parents and grandparents.

We urge residents of Berkeley and of surrounding communities who care about conserving our historic architecture to attend this important hearing.

David Welsh

Berkeley

The evacuation of California

A recent Times article, "Texas tries to woo businesses," described how Texas is actively recruiting businesses to leave California.

California now has the highest income and sales taxes and is rated by business organizations as among the most business unfriendly states in the United States.

California has gone downhill from being a business magnet and one of the most vibrant economies in the world. Today, we have about 10 percent unemployment, and businesses, as well as high-income earners, are evacuating.

Those doubting should Google "businesses leaving California" or "high income leaving California." When viewing this, one must remember this was almost all before Gov. Jerry Brown's tax increases.

To maintain the current level of wasteful spending, as money and jobs leave California, the tax rates will have to go even higher. In short, California is in a death spiral.

The Legislature, controlled for decades by the ruling Democratic Party, has viewed ever more government as good. This will continue to push out the private sector.

Mark Fernwood

Danville

A million here, a billion there

Should MTC spend $5.6 million on the bridge opening celebration?

Why quibble about a few million dollars after it blew a billion or more extra dollars on that unnecessary "signature" post in the middle of the bridge?

Ross M. Laverty

Kensington