Support Danville's isolationism

If the model citizens of Danville do not want to comply with the state mandate of providing open land for affordable housing, for fear of becoming "another Antioch," I feel we common Contra Costa folk should support their goal of isolationism.

In the next county election, we could garner the required two-thirds majority vote for Danville's secession from Contra Costa County. It's a win-win proposition. Danville's allocation of state money could be equally distributed among cities who have demonstrated a moral obligation of ensuring affordable housing.

The 15th-century Lords of Danville would rest comfortably in their gated castles, preserve their quality of life, and avoid granting their collective fief to the middle-class vassals.

The official Danville website declares, "Shop ... There is a reason why Danville is one of the premier destinations in the East Bay! Come to our downtown and find out for yourself."

No thanks. As a 33-year resident of Antioch, I'll spend my money locally. Danville is not a destination on my GPS.

Bob Lee

Antioch

Sowell is prone to amnesia

The Iraq and Afghanistan wars were huge unfunded expenditures that existed outside the U.S. budget. That means the Defense Department got more than its allocated funds to conduct these approved wars.


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How can Thomas Sowell be so wrong in his recent column, "Government pensions force skimping on defense"? Let's blame the wrong causes for our financial predicament.

Sequestration's affecting social programs and defense budgets. Public pensioners didn't cause all the spending. Defense budgets are not more important than contractual obligations to many of the taxpayers who paid into our treasury.

Blame weak government oversight and enforcement for the 2008 financial meltdown. It caused the Great Recession, not pensioners. Pensioners didn't get zero-interest loans to stay afloat, as did the financial industry. Most public pensioners don't make wages allowing them to participate in Wall Street investments that bring them capital gains relief. Maybe Sowell's thinking of the politicians who get public pensions -- not the line workers in the IRS, post office, FDA, state DMV, etc.

Today, as before the 2012 election, Sowell speaks with the same verbiage and thought processes of a fear-provoking war-hawk and a financial naysayer prone to amnesia or denials.

Jan Howe

San Ramon

Complicit in legal abortions

We, as parents and adults, set examples for our children to follow.

There are those among us who have voted to make abortion legal and have voted into office leaders in local, state and federal government, including our Parent-in-Chief Barack Obama, who are pro-abortion and push for it through funding.

Why then should we be so shocked when a young man takes a gun, goes to a nearby school and kills 20 precious babies? Isn't he just following our example? After all, it is legal to kill babies, isn't it?

Ora A. Webber

Pinole

Unethical way to raise money

Plaudits to the Times for your editorial scolding local school districts for the irresponsible practice of using capital appreciation bonds to fund school construction.

This is an unseemly and unethical way to raise money, then stick the taxpayers with a huge debt. It seems to me the financial organizations issuing the bonds are equally irresponsible and slimy. In their greed, they, too, are exploiting the taxpayer.

Who gets the shaft? Not the school administrators. Not the bond issuers. We, the property owners, end up paying for their malfeasance.

David Ogden

Walnut Creek

Practice what you preach

This is in reply to a recent letter in the Times from David B. Smith, "Abortion-rights camp should be ashamed," referring to Roe v. Wade.

If you are against abortion, don't have one. If you want to reduce the rate of abortions, introduce yourself to some pregnant teenagers and offer to adopt their children. Or volunteer to lecture in high schools or middle schools on birth control.

Basically, live your life where your mouth is.

Rachel Resnikoff

Berkeley