Terrorists present a clear danger

The recent attack in Boston certainly causes any prudent person to reconsider whether to attend public events, such as ball games, concerts and social gatherings, as well as places like shopping centers. Nowadays, there is a risk of being killed or hurt by terrorist acts.

It should be remembered that terrorists look for maximum results. Thus, public events and places are their targets.

At the same time, law enforcement officers, security authorities and the FBI will be more vigilant in protecting the safety of the public. And members of public attending such events should be more alert and watchful of their surroundings for suspicious persons, packages, and so on. Together, all of us can minimize the risk.

However, there's no guarantee terrorists will not strike. Potentially, there is a clear and present danger.

John Hom

Walnut Creek

Not afraid of my furniture, either

When I heard that I was threatened as much by my own furniture as by terrorism (http://bit.ly/KhypRC), I eyed my sofa with great suspicion.

However, mastering my fears, I resolved to not let my furniture defeat me, and now recline on it at my leisure, without the assistance of Homeland Security or the FBI.

I even sit on my beach chair in public without concern, so I'm not going to let the minuscule chance of public attacks slow me down.


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Jim Mellander

El Sobrante

It is not any more dangerous today

It's not any more dangerous than what Oakland's been for the past 40 years. I lived there for 16 of those years.

It's time again to paraphrase Martin Luther King: The bombs that the United States is dropping in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, Libya and so on are, and will be, exploding in Boston and other U.S. cities.

President Barack Obama and his progressive stooges can now start a campaign to ban chemistry classes and books; mining and dynamite; farming and fertilizers; nitroglycerin, gun powder, plastic explosives, gas cylinders and a long list of etc. Next, it'll be knives, crossbows, arrows, axes, etc.

All of these measures will be taken while strengthening the military and "security forces" budgets; with drones over our heads and all of us being forced to chant "Hail to the Chief."

Leo T. West

San Leandro

Won't reconsider public events

The attack on Boston has not caused me to reconsider public events.

To do so is to yield the field to the terrorists. Terrorists commit these acts because they are few in number and want to have the greatest impact on society in the least amount of time, with the smallest losses to their members.

They succeed when people cower in fear, when the press plays events 24/7, and when we cancel events.

The recent Boston event is similar to the bombing at the Atlanta Olympics in 1996. The perpetrator, Eric Rudolf, wasn't caught for seven years, although he never left the United States. The Boston terrorists were caught because they hung around and continued to commit senseless crimes.

If they had gone to New York and set their bombs, we could have had widespread panic. Terrorists win when we give in to them.

All of us, at any event, need to be vigilant. Question anyone leaving a backpack or package. We need an airport mentality, which says any unattended bag is suspect.

They succeed when we are terrorized. Keep calm and carry on.

Gregg Manning

Clayton

Will attend public meetings

The attack in Boston occurred on income tax day, April 15. Boston was also the site of the original Boston Tea Party, protesting taxation without representation.

I will continue to attend public meetings in Walnut Creek, Pleasant Hill and Martinez to speak against waste, fraud and abuse in government.

Ralph Hoffmann

Walnut Creek