Court's decision makes sense

I applaud the Aug. 14 Times editorial supporting the California Supreme Court's recent ruling allowing trained school personnel to administer insulin to students with diabetes.

This common-sense solution, for the thousands of children who rely on adult help in administering their insulin at school, is an essential step to keeping all children safe at school.

Nurses are good people and they provide valuable services to our schools and our society. Unfortunately, only 5 percent of California schools have a full-time nurse on staff, and even a full-time nurse won't be there all the time.

This ruling will provide the overwhelming majority of the children who need insulin with better access to care than before the ruling.

As a next step, the nursing organizations that brought this lawsuit should focus their efforts on training and supporting the compassionate school personnel who volunteer to help these children with the burdens of diabetes.

Martha Clark

Lafayette Clark is a board member, San Francisco region, American Diabetes Association.

Richmond and Chevron ties

Richmond Councilman Tom Butt said the city needed to lawyer up to sue Chevron to make the "city whole."

What if Chevron does a cost analysis to determine if it would be more profitable to operate the refinery in its present mode or to convert into a blending facility? What if a blending facility would be more profitable due to a reduction of employees, contractors, property taxes and purchases from local business?

If Chevron actually converts to a blending plant, a large portion of Richmond's budget will no longer be available. Will Richmond cut back on public services such as public works, police and fire, public library, recreation, and more? And keep in mind that Chevron also contributes generously to local community groups.

If Richmond must make cuts, will this make the "city whole" or lead to more hardship and violence?

Al Bruzzone

Richmond

'Scandals' lack credibility

This responds to Mark Marcotte's letter, "The tea party is only hope against Obama."

Marcotte complained about President Barack Obama calling the IRS, NSA and Benghazi phony scandals. He said Obama's economic plan consists of wasting trillions of dollars, raising taxes, raising our debt ceiling and, of course, shoving Obamacare down our throats.

Marcotte shouldn't worry about the so-called scandals: Fox News and the right wing echo chamber will continue to claim they are scandals. So far, however, they've been unable to use facts to make their arguments credible.

Obamacare's the law of the land and should continue to reduce the cost of the over-bloated health-care system Republicans, who are too connected to that system, fail to address.

I was amused by Marcotte's characterization of the president as "pathetic" and a "skinny socialist." For the good of our country, Obama remains cool in light of the hatred and overall ignorance Fox News has perpetuated since the start of the tea party.

At this very moment, many Republicans (I'm a former Republican) are sorry the tea party now has the elephant on the rampage.

Tony Daniels

Antioch

PBA founded on anti-CO2 rubbish

Michael Arata's Aug. 16 letter, "PBA supporters hyperbolic crazies," is right on the money.

Plan Bay Area is founded on the anti-CO2 rubbish that even the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change no longer supports.

I was an engineering hydrologist concerned with extending climate data to the dearth of hydrologic data in the 1960-1980 era, for major engineering projects around the world.

This experience led me to write the paper, "Hydroclimatology: A Needed Cross-Discipline," in 1976, which was incorporated in an American Society of Civil Engineers 1980 publication, "Improved Hydrologic Forecasting: Why and How."

It is personally satisfying that Google lists several hundred papers under the hydroclimatology heading.

The PBA hyperbolic crazies in Sacramento are out to redefine local government throughout the state under edicts written by state Sen. Darrell Steinberg and signed by Govs. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jerry Brown. Those edicts give unelected bodies the power to declare urban and rural lands "blighted" and then to condemn noncompliant properties.

Owners of suburban and rural lands and local suburbs should vigorously oppose this attack on their way of life.

Ron Kilmartin

Pleasant Hill