Democrats are the real extremists

Tea party advocates are often called "extremists" in the media.

However, their beliefs are far from being radical. They support our Constitution and the checks and balances that protect our freedoms. They believe in the free-market system fiscal responsibility. These are all things the Democratic Party rejects and opposes.

Which is more radical, the tea party beliefs or the Democratic agenda of reckless, out-of-control spending, spiraling national debt, ever-increasing taxation, and total government control of our lives and economy?

Our national discord is a direct result of President Barack Obama's failure to provide bipartisan leadership. The 2010 health-care reform should have been a bipartisan initiative. Instead, it was written by Democratic extremists and ramrodded through a reluctant Congress.

The current House of Representatives, by definition, represents the will of the people. And the people clearly want Obamacare stopped. Obama's refusal is in direct defiance of the majority.

It is time to go back to square one on health-care reform, scrap the current law, and create new legislation that has broad bipartisan support.

Thomas Nelson

Danville

Chevron being attacked again

Richmond Mayor Gayle McLaughlin can't leave Chevron alone. She rants at Chevron about everything and now it's the Ecuador oil spill.

McLaughlin has done her own "research" regarding the spill and apparently she feels she knows the real facts, which were given to her by her fellow "greenies" in Ecuador. She won't talk to Chevron about the spill because she thinks everything they say will be lies.

But we should listen to her side, since she "knows" what happened. Maybe it's McLaughlin who is lying.

Some of the city leaders constantly criticize Richmond's largest employer and taxpayer. The refinery fire last year was a terrible thing and Chevron has admitted they were are fault. Chevron reimbursed about 24,000 local residents. Probably 90 percent of the claims were attempts to gouge Chevron for everything they could get.

When the environmental impact report for Chevron's new hydrogen plant comes out next year, every environmentalist and greenie will come out against it. Guess who will be their leader: Richmond's answer to the Three Stooges, Mayor McLaughlin.

Erle Brown

El Cerrito

Tea party ideology is very dangerous

Since 2010, a small group of tea party members of the House and Senate have attempted to change how government works.

They say they want smaller government, free markets and to cut taxes. They propose to do this by abolishing the IRS, the departments of Commerce and Education and the Environmental Protection Agency, thereby eliminating all national regulatory standards.

How would their ideology actually work? Each state would be responsible for its own regulations? Let's suppose one state destroys the watershed of another state -- oops.

How would foreign policy and foreign trade policies be handled? Each state negotiates its own policies? Sounds like the South wants to fight the Civil War all over again, but this time to free the corporations.

It's one thing to seek to change what doesn't work, but to seek to change the country for the few, at the expense of the many, isn't patriotic -- it's dangerous.

Tangee Miles

Martinez

Giving to Global Fund is truly pro-growth

Rep. Paul Ryan asked, "Are we interested in treating the symptoms of poverty and economic stagnation ... or do we want to go at the root causes of poverty and economic stagnation by promoting pro-growth policies that promote prosperity?"

One pro-growth policy he should promote is full funding of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. A recent scientific discovery is that early treatment of HIV/AIDS can lead to a 98 percent drop in infection rates.

New diagnostic equipment shortens TB testing and identification from weeks to less than two hours. The AIDS/TB pandemics together kill 3.1 million people a year. They orphan children, sunder families and drag economic development.

Fighting these diseases overseas is much less expensive than fighting them here. Unless these pandemics are greatly reduced, they pose a health threat to our nation.

The United States is hosting an international conference in December to replenish the Global Fund. A U.S. funding pledge of $5 billion over three years will leverage contributions from other nations and safeguard our and the world's health.

Jim Driggers

Concord