Q If you want to turn your attention to a few non-car things: those damn yellow raised-dot surfaces at corners and other places. They're horrible for disabled pedestrians using wheels of any kind, or crutches. We think they might be there for blind people, but they endanger far more mobility-impaired people than the few blind people they might help. They should be banned and removed.

Stan Sieler

A Really?

Q I am handicapped and use a walker. Everywhere I go I have a difficult time walking over the raised yellow buttons that have been placed on every little ramp from the street to sidewalk. Who are those buttons supposed to help? I've noticed others with walkers, wheelchairs or scooters having a difficult time, not to mention pushing a grocery cart over them. They are a pain in the neck.

Linda Smith

Cupertino

A Anyone else?

 

Q In this day and age where our streets are in decay, potholes go unfilled and police are underfunded, why are we doing this minor upgrade and placing raised buttons on sidewalk curbs? I am not unsympathetic to people with disabilities, but what about the cost to all of us? How much does the rebuild of a ramp suck out of the city's funds?

I know these warning zones are to alert the visually impaired they are about to enter the street, but didn't the existing ramp do the same thing? What's next? Paying someone to hold your hand while you cross the street?


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Jim Wissick

San Jose

A The little bumpy things are called "tactile warning devices" and are often referred to as truncated domes. They are a requirement of the Americans with Disabilities Act to warn visually impaired persons that they are leaving a walkway, entering a parking lot or street or nearing a transit boarding location.

The cost of the truncated domes ranges from $22 to $26 per square foot. Business owners pay for the installation of the domes on private property as part of their development cost, and public agencies pay as they develop intersections, roadways, train platforms, etc.

I'm not surprised that some people dislike them, but when the disabled are among the critics, it makes one pause. I, too, find them difficult to navigate when using my walker. What do others, especially the visually impaired, have to say?

Q Why are there some wheelchair ramps these days that have those annoying bumps colored yellow and others black?

Bruce H.

San Jose

A They are colored yellow near schools and at street crossings, but are otherwise usually colored black.

Q What are they planning in the middle of San Tomas Expressway? There are cones from Benton Street to Stevens Creek Boulevard and then areas enclosed by orange tape with dirt dug out and covered with plastic secured by sand bags up to Williams Road. There are signs alerting workers to overhead wires. Several times they have closed off a lane while working in one enclosure and I thought, at last, they will be doing something, but then the workers go away again. What's up?

Bob Gardner

Santa Clara

A You don't see the workers because they are usually underground. The box culvert running down the middle of San Tomas is being repaired after inspectors found it might collapse. Dan-the-County-Man says the $10 million job is a big deal to prevent potential flood damage. Work will take about three years.

Read Gary Richards online at www.mercurynews.com/mr-roadshow. Follow him at Facebook.com/mr.roadshow or Twitter.comw/mrroadshow or contact him at mrroadshow@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5335.