Q The negative impact to the Wolfe Road commute off Interstate 280 due to thousands of Apple employees arriving to work requires more thought. The recently announced plans will only make the Wolfe/280 area total gridlock, just as the De Anza Boulevard/280 area is now. The plan to close Pruneridge Avenue is a huge mistake because this alternate route to Tantau and Lawrence Expressway is sorely needed.

Besides keeping Pruneridge open, I suggest Apple and the city consider adding new exits and onramps from 280 between Wolfe and Tantau. With some modifications to the Apple Vallco One and Two parking lots, this could be accomplished. A southbound 280 exit could connect to Vallco Parkway. A northbound 280 exit could connect directly to new Apple parking areas. These changes would ease congestion. They might have to modify some of the Campus 2 design, but I'm sure Steve Jobs would be OK with that.

Traffic at Pruneridge and Tantau, in the North Vallco area. (Jacqueline Ramseyer/SVCN)
Traffic at Pruneridge and Tantau, in the North Vallco area. (Jacqueline Ramseyer/SVCN)

Robert P.

Cupertino

A This is the second of two Roadshow columns on readers' reactions to Apple's planned new headquarters in Cupertino. Sunday focused on those favoring the sprawling "spaceship" facility. Monday, we hear from those fearing traffic gridlock.

Q The poll on the Mercury News' website asks if the Apple "spaceship" is good for Silicon Valley. The question is disingenuous. The building may be good for Silicon Valley but certainly not in that location.

Traffic on 280 will be intolerable. Also, during construction there will be BIG trucks using 280. One of the few benefits of driving 280 is the lack of big trucks. Those trucks will be chewing up the roadbed every inch of the way. Who gets to pay for repaving? The taxpayer, of course. I feel so sorry for residents in the area.

Ann Walker

A If not here, where would you suggest the new headquarters be built?

Q Traffic on Homestead Road between Wolfe and Lawrence has increased tremendously since Kaiser was built. Is the county preparing for the increased traffic?

Deb Katzman

A The county looked at the traffic impact on Lawrence, expecting it would be total gridlock. Surprise, said Dan-the-County-Man:

"Our assumption was the added traffic would blow up the expressways. Not so as it turns out. Believe it or not, there is room for additional traffic without reaching the mitigation thresholds on the portion of Lawrence most likely to attract trips, from Homestead to Saratoga."

A double left turn from Saratoga to Lawrence would help, but no widening of Lawrence is planned.

Q I live in proximity in Sunnyvale and am beyond dreading this monstrosity and the nightmares it will bring. To Scott Herhold: Would you be singing its praises if it were to be dropped in the middle of Hanchett Park? Maybe you wouldn't be so cavalier and dismissive of the issues. Sunnyvale may have nothing "memorable" in it, but having lived here over 20 years I'll take that over headaches, which will arise from this building.

Mary Reiland

A Folks, traffic jams are popping up everywhere -- on the Dumbarton Bridge near Facebook, at Mathilda Avenue and Highway 237 in Sunnyvale and soon along North First Street at Brokaw Road as new developments go in. Already I-280 is stop-and-crawl. How do we fix it? Can we fix it?

Look for Gary Richards at Facebook.com/mr.roadshow or contact him at mrroadshow@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5335.