LIVERMORE

Dr. Temple Grandin to speak at Las Positas

Dr. Temple Grandin, the best-selling author of books on animal behavior and autism and one of Time magazine's 100 most influential people in the world, will speak April 24 at Las Positas College.

Grandin, who is autistic, is an associate professor of animal science at Colorado State University. Her life has been the subject of an award-winning HBO biopic and numerous television specials. She is also author of "The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum," "Thinking in Pictures: My Life with Autism" and "Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals."

Grandin's speech will be at 7 p.m. in the Mertes Center for the Arts, 3000 Campus Hill Drive. Admission is $20, $15 for students. Tickets may be bought at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/608499. There is a $2 campus parking fee. For details, contact Ernest Jones at 925-424-1217 or email ejones@laspositascollege.edu.

-- Jeremy Thomas, Staff

PLEASANTON

Alviso Adobe spring fest -- fun with eggs

The city will celebrate spring with two fun-with-eggs sessions April 19 for children ages 4 and older at the Alviso Adobe Community Park, 3465 Old Foothill Road.

The Spring Celebration costs $20 per child, $23 for nonresidents. Children will take part in an egg drop, dying eggs with natural dyes, doing an egg facts search, taking part in an egg toss and visiting with bunnies supplied by Abbie 4-H Club.

There are two sessions available, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 3 to 5 p.m. Register online at www.pleasantonfun.com or call 925-931-3485. There is no charge for parents to attend.

-- Kelly Gust, Staff

LIVERMORE

Drug Take Back Day April 26 in Livermore

In conjunction with National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, the Livermore police department will collect expired, unwanted and unused prescription medications on April 26.

The event will take place in front of police headquarters at 1110 S. Livermore Ave. from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Participants may dispose of medication in its original container or by removing the medication from its container and disposing of it directly into the disposal box.

If an original container is submitted, identifying information must be removed from the prescription label. Intravenous solutions, injectibles and syringes will not be accepted due to potential hazards posed by blood-borne pathogens. For more information, call crime prevention officer Nichole Aguon at 925-371-4978.

-- Jeremy Thomas, Staff