RENO, Nev.—Investigators suspect foul play in the disappearance of Nevada's chief insurance examiner after evidence of a bloody, violent struggle was uncovered in his apartment, the Carson City sheriff said Friday.

Sheriff's deputies were called to the apartment Thursday after William McCune, 62, failed to board a flight with a co-worker and other employees found no sign of him when they went to his residence. Sheriff Ken Furlong said Friday that investigators found blood scattered throughout areas of the apartment that indicated an "obvious struggle," but it was too early to say whether anyone died.

"We have no information at this point in time that it had anything to do with his work," the sheriff told The Associated Press. "I would suggest to you the opposite ... This appears at this point in time to involve a personal relationship, someone he knew. It could be someone related to the apartment."

There was no sign of forced entry of the residence, Furlong said, adding McCune is single and apparently has no children.

Nevada Division of Insurance spokesman Jake Sunderland declined to comment on the case, but said McCune has held his position since December 2009 and has worked similar jobs for two decades.

As head of the division's corporate and financial affairs section, McCune worked to ensure the solvency of insurance companies in the state. He was charged with ensuring that each company had sufficient money in their reserves to cover all claims and obligations.


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McCune's car was parked in front of the apartment complex when co-workers first knocked on his apartment door Wednesday, but was gone by the time they returned Thursday morning. The car was later found at a nearby apartment complex.

McCune's pickup truck has not been found.

Authorities assume blood found in McCune's one-bedroom unit at Villas of Dolphin Bay Apartments is his, but can't say that conclusively yet, Furlong said.

Investigators spent Thursday and Friday processing evidence at the scene, he said, and may have to work through the weekend before they wrap up.

"Our forensic senior criminologist says it's the most tedious (crime scene) he has processed in 25 years," Furlong said. "There's a lot of evidence to be processed. We can't analyze anything until we're done processing it."

There's no indication of the weapon or weapons involved in the struggle yet, he said, but they may be uncovered in the apartment.

"We are looking at every item in the house. We are collecting numerous things from the apartment that could suggest they were used in the struggle," the sheriff said.

Detectives also are trying to track down and interview people who had direct or indirect contact with McCune.