Here's what is known so far about Christopher Boone Lacy, the 36-year-old man accused of shooting and fatally wounding California Highway Patrol officer Kenyon Youngstrom during a traffic stop before being shot and killed by another officer Tuesday morning on Interstate 680 in Alamo.

Youngstrom was pronounced dead Wednesday.

Lacy grew up in the central Oregon city of Bend, according to his father, Craig Lacy, who said in a brief phone interview with ABC7 that his son was smart but was troubled by mental illness, describing him as bipolar but not violent. According to his personal website, Lacy played in a hometown band dubbed The Jiggawatts.

Lacy relocated to the Bay Area to attend San Francisco State University, where he earned a master's degree in computer science in 2005, according to his family and the college. While there, he served as president of the campus chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery.

The professor who served as Lacy's faculty adviser for his master's project could not be reached for comment.

Lacy's resume boasts extensive knowledge in several computer programming languages, and he employed his skills in a string of contract jobs encompassing nearly a dozen firms and organizations. The most notable was eBay, where from 2008 to 2009 he was a contract engineer working on several aspects of the online giant's web interface.


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Most of the firms Lacy claims to have worked for either had no quick way of verifying his employment or had no easy way of being contacted.

Public records show Lacy lived in Sausalito from 2004 to 2011. While living in Sausalito, Lacy was arrested for driving under the influence and speeding in October 2006 but the DUI charge was dropped for lack of evidence, according to the Marin County District Attorney's Office. He paid a fine for the speeding infraction.

Last year, Lacy got a $28,000 loan to buy a plot of land in the Rancho Tehama subdivision of Corning, a town 25 miles northwest of Chico. A secretary at the Homeowners Association there said she had seen him come in a few times to pay assessments but didn't know him.

According to Corning Police Chief Don Atkins, Lacy had no known contact with law enforcement from Corning police, Red Bluff police or the Tehama County Sheriff's Department.

Now far from the reaches of the Silicon Valley, he billed himself as "Available for remote contract work from Northern California" to prospective employers. Once he settled in, Lacy farmed produce and sold it online. He volunteered his skills for Freedom Engineering, an anti-authoritarian web startup whose only discernible goal is to attract programmers who can help them "Think up the best ideas for technology that helps people be more free."

Staff writers Robert Salonga and Mark Emmons, and Red Bluff Daily News reporter Julie Zeeb contributed to this report.