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An online community has reacted to the recent killings, manhunt and final standoff of fired Los Angles police officer Christopher Dorner by creating a video game titled, "Chris Dorner's Last Stand: A True American Hero."

A series of videos that has surfaced on YouTube in the days since Dorner's death at the end of a gun battle and standoff at a cabin near Barton Flats, purportedly created by the online community 4chan, show portions of the gameplay.

The player plays as Dorner, and the goal of the game - based on a version of the 1993 first-person shooter "Doom" - is to shoot police officers.

The game begins in a secluded cabin, which features a portrait of Charlie Sheen on an interior wall. The actor recorded a video message to Dorner asking the fugitive to contact him last week as the manhunt was ongoing.

An image of former California governor and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger is inserted the game as one of the protagonist's enemies.

In addition to violence, the game is loaded with racist overtones, with generous use of racial epithets and stereotypes. The Dorner character regenerates his health by eating buckets of fried chicken.

A brief statement that accompanies one of the online videos reads, "Yes this game is in bad taste. We dare you not to laugh."

But are user-generated video games, such as "Dorner's Last Stand," and the influence of the messages they contain be something parents of video game-loving kids should be concerned about? USC professor of sociology and popular culture expert Karen Sternheimer said she was not worried.

"I'm not sure how effective user-generated games are at reaching a mass audience for parents to be that concerned," she said. "It is more likely that people who might seek out certain messages use various forms of media as a means of reinforcing beliefs rather than creating new ones."

And Sternheimer pointed out that the arena of video games is not only popular among kids and teens.

"According to industry data, the average age of a gamer is 30," she said.

In another YouTube video, a user posting under the name PurpleHCross posted a video of himself playing and commenting on the game.

"Your objective is to kill a bunch of police because they're racist, apparently. Not apparently, they are."

The poster said he was pleased by the fact that the officers in the video game were only depicted as white.

brian.day@sgvn.com

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