Josh Richman covers politics. Contact him at 510-208-6428. Follow him at Twitter.com/josh_richman. Read the Political Blotter at IBAbuzz.com/politics.

Aug. 14

Gov. Jerry Brown got a letter from 28 California House Democrats this week urging him to sign the TRUST Act, which would limit how the state's law enforcement officers cooperate with federal immigration efforts.

The lawmakers -- including all but two of the Bay Area's House members -- wrote that the bill "sets clear, uniform standards to limit burdensome detentions of aspiring citizens by local law enforcement solely on the basis of federal immigration detainer requests. The measure is designed to enhance public safety and protect civil liberties, while also promoting fiscal responsibility at the state and local levels."

More than 100,000 people have been deported from California under federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Secure Communities (S-Comm) program, the lawmakers noted. "Civic and faith leaders from California and across the nation have forcefully argued that we should not deport today those who could be on the road to citizenship tomorrow."

Furthermore, there's evidence that S-Comm has reduced crime victims' willingness to cooperate with police lest they themselves end up being deported, and that's not good for public safety, the House members wrote.

Brown vetoed a version of the TRUST Act last year. But the lawmakers noted the current version -- AB 4 by Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, D-San Francisco -- "gives law enforcement much broader discretion to honor detainer requests."


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"It will ensure that those who have not been convicted of any crime, have only been convicted of minor crimes, or those who are only identified by the S-Comm program because of their immigration history are not held on costly and unfair federal immigration detainers," they wrote.

The only Bay Area House members who didn't sign the letter were Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, and Rep. Jerry McNerney, D-Stockton.

"I support the sentiment of the TRUST Act," McNerney said by email. "We need change in our country in the form of comprehensive immigration reform. Our country is founded on a long and proud immigrant history, and we need to find a clear path to citizenship for the law-abiding and hardworking people who want to join the United States of America. These people deserve a defined and manageable path to citizenship."

A Speier staffer said she hasn't talked to Ammiano about the bill yet, and "she wants to do that before she takes a position."

The Assembly passed AB 4 with a 44-22 vote on May 16. It now awaits a state Senate floor vote; if it passes, it'll go to Brown's desk.

Aug. 15

Of the 254 counties in which food-stamp recipients doubled between 2007 and 2011, 213 were carried by Republican nominee Mitt Romney in last year's presidential election, Bloomberg reported this week.

So it seems the heightened need for federal aid to combat hunger is primarily a red-state (or at least red-county) phenomenon. Yet House Republicans recently passed a Farm Bill reauthorization which didn't include the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. They've said they intend to move a separate bill that would cut $4 billion per year from food stamps and similar programs.

Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Oakland, joined with three other lawmakers this week to release a letter signed by more than 200 House Democrats urging Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, to restore SNAP funding to the final Farm Bill.

"We voted against this bill in large part because of this intentional omission," they wrote. "We strongly believe in the critical importance of SNAP. Given the essential nature of this program to millions of American families, the final language of the Farm Bill or any other legislation related to SNAP must be crafted to ensure that we do not increase hunger in America."