ALAMEDA -- Life with Terrelle Pryor at quarterback means learning on the fly.

Repetition is everything in the NFL, with an emphasis on precision and footwork. Pryor is improving at that part of his game but does some of his best work extemporaneously, a jazz musician amid the concert band.

"Where it gets into a lot of the exciting stuff is when I take off and start to make a play, and that's just reaction," Pryor said. "If nothing's there with the reads, just react and go make a play."

When the Raiders host the Jacksonville Jaguars on Sunday in their home opener, some of the plays that will draw the biggest reaction from the sellout crowd will be when Pryor goes off script.

Wide receiver Rod Streater worked out with Pryor often during the offseason, but a 17-yard reception thrown by Pryor following a 10-second left-to-right scramble against Indianapolis wasn't drawn up on any chalkboard.

"We try to replicate it at practice, but you really can't," Streater said. "It's just a natural thing. You've just got to go out, feel it and get open."

Wide receiver Denarius Moore said his position group is taking more practice reps at game speed to make sure they're in condition to handle the extra effort it takes with Pryor on the loose.

"A normal play takes three to five seconds, but with Terrelle it can last up to 10 seconds," Moore said. "There's a bit of conditioning involved, but it's more good than bad."

Offensive linemen must hold their blocks longer, which right tackle Tony Pashos said is part of the job description.

"In general an offensive lineman doesn't have an egg timer on his plays," Pashos said. "You listen for whistles or crowd noise. You stay on your guy, no matter who it is. I've never thought of it as some task that's hard to do."

When Pryor started last season's final game against the San Diego Chargers, former offensive coordinator Greg Knapp did little to put Pryor in positions to create, executing a plan that wasn't markedly different from what Matt Leinart ran the week before.

Greg Olson, who replaced Knapp this season, has adjusted the system since the decision was made to go with Pryor over Matt Flynn.

Pryor's presence, Olson said, has changed how everyone on the offense operates.

"I just think it's a different mindset for everybody and every position -- wide receiver, certainly, offensive lineman, certainly," Olson said. "Where's he going to be? He's not a pocket drop-back passer. That's not his game, and we certainly don't want that to become his game right now.

"As athletic as he is, we embellish and appreciate that part of Terrelle Pryor. Everyone is on their toes. When he does create, it creates excitement. I think the players feed off of it as much as the fans do."

At the same time, Pryor is getting better with quick-read throws, short slant routes in particular.

"There are timing things where the ball should be getting out, and he does get it out," Olson said. "He'll continue to improve. He works at it."

Pryor remains outwardly confident in his ability to complete passes both short and long.

"I believe in my ability and the guys know they've got to get on their high horse when I've got a downfield ball, because I'm going to get it out there," he said.

  • Tight end David Ausberry (shoulder) and tackle Menelik Watson (knee) were ruled out of the Jacksonville game. Safety Tyvon Branch (shoulder) and kicker Sebastian Janikowski (calf) are probable.

  • Janikowski said he spoke with Jacksonville kicker Josh Scobee about his comments that Janikowski wanted the A's to lose so he wouldn't have to kick off a dirt infield.

    "It's a done deal," Janikowski said.

    Scobee told the Florida Times-Union he was just kidding and that "I obviously shouldn't have joked around about it."

    For more on the Raiders, visit the Inside the Oakland Raiders blog at ibabuzz.com/oaklandraiders. Follow Jerry McDonald on Twitter at twitter.com/Jerrymcd.

    SuNDAY'S GAME
    Jacksonville (0-1) at Raiders (0-1), 1:25 p.m. CBS