OAKLAND -- Even though the Warriors came up a victory shy of tying their all-time franchise winning streak, a strong case can be made that it was still the best sustained run in the club's history.

Reason? Road wins -- seven of them during the 10-game winning streak. The Warriors have gone entire seasons without winning seven road games -- three times since 1985-86, in fact. In three other seasons, they managed only seven.

A number of the seven wins during the streak weren't cupcake victories, either. The Warriors won in Denver, where they had been a nightmarish 2-16 since 2003. For the second straight year, they beat the NBA champion Miami Heat in its home building. They also beat Atlanta, one of six victories against teams with winning records during the 10-game streak.

Those accomplishments far outstrip the 1971-72 team's 11-game streak (five road wins, none against teams with winning records) and the 1975-76 club's 10-gamer (five road wins, also none against teams with winning records).

But it's the road wins that speak the loudest.

"I don't care who you play in this league on the road, those are tough games to win," said coach Mark Jackson. "For us to be able to do that, especially at a point where we were not playing our best basketball, it's pretty impressive. It's something for our guys to build on, and we're in a good place right now."

The Warriors have played 23 road games -- at least three more than any other team in the league -- and after Wednesday night's game at Oracle Arena against Denver, Golden State will play at Oklahoma City and New Orleans before a favorable stretch heading into the All-Star break -- 9 of 11 at home.

The Warriors are 13-10 on the road, and you only have to look at their ugly away-game history to understand how good that is. They had only seven winning records on the road in their 66 seasons of existence before this year. They have a shot at equaling or bettering the all-time best road mark established by the 1991-92 Warriors, who went 24-17.

"We expect to win on the road now," said Stephen Curry. "We go into other team's buildings with the mentality that if we play like we're supposed to over a 48-minute game, we should put ourselves in position to win. It shouldn't be a surprise when we win those games now."

That confidence on the road actually started last season when the Warriors went 6-1 on a seven-game trip. Curry said that confidence has grown since then.

"It's kind of funny, when you look at last year, we went into Miami expecting to play well and have a shot to win the game, but our celebration at the end of the game was like, 'Wow, we won,'" he said. "This year, we went down there and won the game and had a sense of this is what we're supposed to do."

David Lee said the team's road mentality is as strong as any team he's been on since he's been in the league. He thinks it's a function of the team's defensive abilities, which have improved with the additions of Andrew Bogut and Andre Iguodala.

"Defense travels well is a phrase a lot of coaches use, and it's true," he said. "You're going to have a lot of nights on the road when you're not going to shoot the ball as well. It's very difficult, so you have to play good defense and you have to rebound. That's why a team like San Antonio is so good on the road."

Jackson agrees wholeheartedly with the defensive theory.

"We are built on the defensive side of the basketball," he said. "When you are built on the offensive side, that will come and go. But when you have a mindset to get stops, when you take pride on the defensive end, that act travels, and we're able to get it done no matter where we play. I think the guys believe, too."

Iguodala knows how critical it is to bank road wins early in the season. He played on a Denver team last year that played 18 of its first 25 games on the road, managed to scrape out a 13-12 record, then capitalized on a favorable home schedule the rest of the way and wound up winning 57 games.

"Last year in Denver we probably had the worst road schedule to start a season in NBA history," he said. "So I can't really compare the two at all. The key on the road is taking care of business you should take care of, and we've done that for the most part this year."

  • Rookie guard Nemanja Nedovic will miss at least two weeks with a strained left hamstring, the club announced.

    Wednesday's game
    Denver (19-18) at Warriors (25-14), 7:30 p.m. CSNBA, ESPN

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