Philip Seymour Hoffman's friend, playwright David Bar Katz, has filed a $50 million lawsuit against National Enquirer publisher America Media Inc. on Wednesday, a day after the Enquirer reportedly quoted Katz saying he and the late actor were lovers.

That was fast.

In a complaint filed in the New York Supreme Court, Bar Katz says, "The story is a complete fabrication: There was no interview. Bar Katz and Hoffman were never lovers. Bar Katz did not see Hoffman freebasing cocaine the night before he died, or at any other time. Bar Katz never saw Hoffman use heroin or cocaine."

Wow -- it's one thing to make up a story. But to fabricate quotes from the guy the story is about and not expect to get sued? Either someone over at the National Enquirer made a serious miscalculation, or they better have a tape of this guy saying he and Hoffman were more than friends.

Of course, as the Huffington Post points out, the Enquirer is accustomed to defamation lawsuits from celebrities. The website said, in such cases, the plaintiffs are usually public figures who must demonstrate actual malice in reporting falsehoods.

The site said Bar Katz is arguably a limited-purpose public figure for being connected to Hoffman, but the lawsuit disputes that. "Bar Katz is not a public figure for defamation purposes," the complaint says. "Even if Bar Katz is a public figure, the Enquirer had actual knowledge that the statements were false, or acted with reckless disregard for the truth."

Contact Tony Hicks at Facebook.com/BayAreaNewsGroup.TonyHicks or Twitter.com/insertfoot.