This is a sampling from Bay Area News Group's Political Blotter blog. Read more and post comments at www.ibabuzz.com/politics.

Feb. 4

Former inmates on post-release community supervision and mandatory supervision should be eligible to vote, civil rights groups argue in a lawsuit filed Tuesday against California Secretary of State Debra Bowen.

Bowen issued a directive in 2011 that people in these categories -- which were created under the prison realignment plan pursued by Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature -- were ineligible to cast ballots.

But the lawsuit -- filed in Alameda County Superior Court by the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California on behalf of the League of Women Voters of California, the All of Us Or None inmate rights group, and several individuals -- notes the state constitution specifies that every adult Californian has a right to vote except while "imprisoned or on parole for a conviction of a felony" or mentally incompetent.

More than 58,000 people have been wrongly disenfranchised by Bowen's "administrative fiat," the lawsuit claims.

"Voting is a civic duty, and prohibiting people who are living in the community under these new forms of community supervision from participating in this critical part of our democracy serves no useful purpose and is likely to impede reintegration and rehabilitation into civil society," the lawsuit says.

Also, Bowen violated the California Administrative Procedure Act by issuing her directive without giving any public notice or allowing comments, the suit claims. "These requirements are meant to ensure that people who will be affected by a government rule or policy can have a voice in its creation and to provide, as our supreme court has put it, some security against 'bureaucratic tyranny.'"

A similar lawsuit was filed in 2012, but the state Court of Appeal and Supreme Court both declined to review the case, so Bowen's interpretation of the law stood. Bowen won't comment on pending litigation, a spokeswoman said Tuesday.

Feb. 6

Mark the date: This is one of the few times you ever will see U.S. Sens. Barbara Boxer and Ted Cruz supporting the same cause.

Boxer, the California liberal, and Cruz, the tea party darling from Texas, are among 53 Senators -- 44 Democrats and nine Republicans -- who have publicly voiced support for a bill to create an independent military justice system. The Senate is expected to vote next week on S.1752, the Military Justice Improvement Act by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., as well as on additional sexual assault reforms sponsored by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo.

"It is time to bring an end to the broken promises of 'zero tolerance' for sexual assault. Enough already," Boxer said in a news release. "It is time to fix our military justice system and to give survivors a chance at the justice they deserve by enacting the Military Justice Improvement Act."

Cruz commended Gillibrand for her leadership on the issue, saying the bill "will address the most serious crimes in the military while enabling commanders to focus on their wartime mission and ensure that the rights of both victims and those accused of crimes are protected. Our strongest allies have adopted similar military justice changes and their experience shows us that this can be done without harming the chain of command or military readiness. I look forward to continue working with her on this important issue."

Victims of military sexual assault often have described feeling fearful when deciding whether to report the crimes because the military chain of command has an inherent conflict of interest and bias in deciding whether to prosecute.

The bill moves the decision whether to prosecute any crime punishable by one year or more in confinement to independent, trained, professional military prosecutors who aren't beholden to the usual chain of command. Excepted from the bill are 37 serious crimes that are uniquely military in nature, such as disobeying orders or going absent without leave, plus all crimes punishable by less than a year behind bars.