Anyone who might have feared Oracle CEO Larry Ellison would desecrate the lush Hawaiian island of Lanai, which he bought in 2012 for a reported $500 million, might take comfort in a new website, Love Lanai.

The website is full of gorgeous images of the island's breathtaking vistas along with reassuring references to "honoring heritage" and "land preservation."

It also contains inviting details for visitors to enjoy its pristine beauties. Among other things, it promotes the island as a great place for weddings and family vacations, touts its luxury shopping and eating destinations, and notes that it will host international film and food festivals in 2015.

In addition, the website promises an upcoming television series -- dubbed "Lanai Beyond the Grid" -- which it hails as "an inspiring exploration on sustainable leadership and how a little island can change the world by reminding us the most powerful force in human nature is to care."

Deborah Hellinger, spokeswoman for Redwood City-based software company that Ellison oversees, wouldn't comment on whether her boss had created or at least approved of the site -- http://lovelanai.com. But it seems likely it wouldn't last long if it didn't suit Ellison, a multibillionaire who owns 98 percent of the island.

So far, Hawaiians seem to be taking a wait-and-see attitude about Ellison's purchase of Lanai, according to Robert Harris, director of the Sierra Club of Hawaii.


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"I would say there is optimism and caution," he said, noting that Ellison among other things reopened a public pool on the island that had been shut down by Lanai's previous owner, David Murdock, who many local residents disliked. In addition, Harris said Ellison has won widespread support for his economic improvements on the island as part of his push to make it more self sufficient.

Robin Kaye, spokesman for Friends of Lanai, agreed that Ellison generally is regarded as a better steward of the tiny island's environmental and cultural heritage than Murdock. But he added that many residents there remain concerned about a widely criticized wind energy project Murdock had proposed, which he apparently still retains the ability to construct. And while the Love Lanai website focuses heavily on bringing tourists to the island, it makes little reference to Lanai's longtime residents.

"How that impacts people who are born and raised here all their lives," he said, "we don't know."

Contact Steve Johnson at sjohnson@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5043. Follow him at Twitter.com/steveatmercnews