PALO ALTO -- High-flying electric-car company Tesla Motors hit more record stock prices Thursday, after the company projected booming growth in 2014 and CEO Elon Musk answered questions about his dealings with Silicon Valley tech giant Apple.

Tesla shares reached as high as $215.21 Thursday on Wall Street before closing with an 8.4 percent gain at $209.97, reflecting record intraday and closing prices for the stock.

Investors received more detail Wednesday afternoon about Tesla's plans for 2014, and seemed to like what they saw. The Palo Alto company announced that it expects to boost sales of its signature Model S electric car by 55 percent in 2014, to roughly 35,000 cars, while maintaining a powerful gross margin of 28 percent. Musk also promised to share details next week on Tesla's plans to build a factory to manufacture its own batteries, which would conceivably cut down on costs while allowing the company to generate more revenue selling batteries to other companies such as SolarCity, a San Mateo solar installer for which Musk serves as chairman.

"We believe we are witnessing the most disruptive intersection of manufacturing, innovation and capital experienced by the auto industry in more than a century," Morgan Stanley analyst Adam Jonas wrote in a Thursday morning note. "Tesla may be in position to disrupt industries well beyond the realm of traditional auto manufacturing. It's not just cars."

Tesla's projections for 2014 arrived with financial results from the fourth quarter and full year of 2013, which showed Tesla continuing to quickly ramp up production and sales of its Model S and produce profits. Tesla reported a loss of $16 million, or 13 cents a share, on revenue of $615 million; after adjustments for one-time costs and other factors, though, the company raked in profits of $46 million, or 33 cents a share, on revenue of $761 million to cap off a year in which it sold 22,477 cars.

Tesla's stock price set its previous intraday high of $206 Tuesday, after a Bay Area newspaper reported that Musk met with the head of Apple's mergers and acquisitions, Adrian Pernica, in 2013, sparking rumors of a possible Apple acquisition of the electric car company. Musk responded to those rumors in an interview with Bloomberg TV on Wednesday evening, admitting that he had spoken with Apple but calling an acquisition of Tesla "very unlikely."

"We had conversations with Apple," Musk said. "I can't comment on whether those revolved around any kind of acquisition."

When asked whether Tesla could be for sale in a general sense, Musk said it would basically take a perfect scenario for such a deal.

"I think that's very unlikely because we need to stay super focused on ... creating a compelling mass market electric car," Musk said, later adding, "if there was a scenario where it seemed like it would be more likely that we would be able to create the mass market sort of affordable, compelling electric car, then possibly it would make sense to entertain those discussions."

Staff writer Dana Hull contributed to this report. Contact Jeremy C. Owens at 408-920-5876; follow him at Twitter.com/jowens510.