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Joseph Luft retired Berkeley psychologist who pioneered a model for categorizing the conscious and subconscious areas of our mind died Friday after being struck by a car in the intersection of Bancroft Way and Sacramento Street in Berkeley, Calif. (courtesy of Luft Family)

BERKELEY--A retired Berkeley psychologist who pioneered a model for categorizing conscious and subconscious areas of our mind died Friday after being struck by a car.

Joseph Luft was out for his daily walk and crossing the intersection of Bancroft Way and Sacramento Street around 12:20 p.m. when he was hit, according to Berkeley police.

Luft was able to speak with emergency personnel at the scene, but died six hours later after being taken to a hospital.

On Saturday, the Luft family released a statement, saying Luft was a World War II veteran and a renowned psychologist who cherished his daily walks, something he had done for more than 50 years.

"While his death was sudden, he died doing what he loved," said daughter Rachel Luft. "We do not yet know the details of what happened, but our hearts go out to the driver of the car and his family during this difficult time."

Luft had celebrated his 98th birthday just two days before the fatal accident.

The driver involved in the collision remained at the scene on Friday and is cooperating with police. Police do not believe drugs or alcohol were factors in the collision.

In 1955, Luft, and colleague Harry Ingram developed the Johari Window model, a psychology tool that measures how personality is expressed. Luft spent more than 30 years teaching at San Francisco State University and became an emeritus professor in 1986.

Contact Karina Ioffee at kioffee@bayareanewsgroup.com. Follow her at Twitter.com/kioffee