SAN FRANCISCO -- Berti Vogts, one of the greatest defenders in German history, has dual roles this week in the Bay Area.

Vogts, 67, is in charge of Azerbaijan's national team that plays the United States on Tuesday night at Candlestick Park in the Americans' first exhibition game as a World Cup unit.

Then he will join U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann as an adviser who scouts the Americans' upcoming World Cup opponents.

The man who also coached Scotland and Nigeria already has some thoughts about Ghana, the Americans' first World Cup challenge June 16 in Brazil.

"The striker and the midfielders are very, very good," Vogts said Sunday before Azerbaijan trained at Candlestick. "They're quick, they are physical."

Vogts added that the United States' best chance might be attacking from the wings, because Ghana's defense is compact. He also said Ghana plays similarly to Nigeria.

The Americans are scheduled to face Nigeria in an exhibition June 7 in Jacksonville, Florida, before departing for Brazil.

"Ghana is one of the best teams in Africa," Vogts added. "And all the players, they play around the world, good players. The most important thing is to win the first match.

"But first, the USA, they have to play against Azerbaijan."

  • Vogts sounded like a fan of outside midfielder Julian Green, a German teenager with an American father. Green, 18, has appeared only once for the United States in a game last month against Mexico. He plays for a fourth division team part of Bayern Munich's system.

    "I saw him in the training," Vogts said. "He is a very, very talented player. He's very quick, and speedy, that's what you need. Maybe he can come in the last 20 minutes, the last 10 minutes."

  • Klinsmann was part of three World Cup teams coached by Vogts, who was an assistant when Germany won in 1990. Vogts recalled telling the teenage Klinsmann to switch to the middle from the wing position.

    "He did it, and he started a big, big career," Vogts said. "He is so enthusiastic. He's more American than a German. The Germans are always thinking about things, but Jurgen is so positive, that's the American way of life. That's good for the team, good for the supporters, good for all of them here."

  • Sporting Kansas City teammates Matt Besler and Graham Zusi didn't show too much emotion after learning they were headed to Brazil last week.

    "We didn't have a bromance hug," Besler said before practice Sunday at Stanford. "I'm sorry to disappoint you."

  • Despite a push to get more U.S. Latinos involved with the national team, attacking midfielder Alejandro Bedoya and defender Omar Gonzalez are the only Hispanics to make Klinsmann's team.

    Bedoya, whose parents are Colombian immigrants from Miami, appreciates the distinction.

    "I feel like I am the only Latin American," said Bedoya, who plays at Nantes in the top French division. "No offense to Omar, but I speak way better Spanish than he does."