60 years

Liberty Gridders to be guests of Lions Club: A real championship celebration is in prospect for Monday evening when the Brentwood Lions play host to the Liberty Union High School football squad and coaches.

The Liberty Lions have won the EBCAL gridiron title for two years in succession, an accomplishment which will add zest to Monday night's dinner. The annual Lions football dinner has become a custom, and is given regardless of the record of the team.

This year, as usual, the dinner will be served at Veterans Hall with Joe Silva in charge of arrangements and Bill Stanford planning and serving the dinner. More than 300 persons are expected to the tables, including the entire football squad, the Lions and their wives and invited guests.

The highlight of the evening will be the awards. To fill in the gaps, Silva has rounded up a number of acts to be presented while dinner is being served. Artie Honegger, former University of California grid star, will be master of ceremonies as president of the Lions.

25 years ago

Working sheep ranch gives 4-Hers real experience: You're 13 years old and you're lying in a sleeping bag, on the hardwood floor of a rustic farm building, awaiting your turn to tend to a sick lamb. How do you feel? If you are one of Marianne McGill's 4-H kids, you probably feel like you and your friends are running a working sheep and cattle ranch all by yourselves.


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That feeling, McGill said, is the "charm" of spending three nights a year, in the spring lambing season, at the University of California's Elkus 4-H Ranch just outside of Half Moon Bay.

Of course, there is not always a sick lamb to tend, but there was the first time McGill took her group to Elkus.

"We had to feed it every two hours, so we set up a schedule where two kids would go out with an adult every two hours. Some of the kids got so involved that they went out each time, even though they were not scheduled to go, so they didn't get much sleep."

-- Brentwood News files

"In spite of the hard work, the kids really did thrive on it, and they wanted to go back," McGill said. In fact, they love the ranch experience so much she said, "that at the beginning of each year the first thing they ask me is, are we going back to the ranch this year?"

McGill also shared memories of her mostly-city kids patiently waiting outside sheep pens to watch the birth of a lamb. The youngsters also get involved in sheep clipping and other routine farm activities.

-- Brentwood News files