Forty-three previous fighters have failed to achieve what Gilroy's Robert "The Ghost" Guerrero hopes to pull off Saturday night at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

"Man, I'm ready," Guerrero said. "Floyd Mayweather's record is going to get broken, he's going to have his first loss. Better believe that."

The oddsmakers don't believe it. They have installed Mayweather (43-0, 26 knockouts) as a heavy favorite to stay perfect at the expense of Guerrero (31-1-1, 18 KOs) in their WBC welterweight title bout.

Mayweather, who has held at least one world championship belt continuously since 1998, was listed this week by the MGM Grand sportsbook as minus-700 (bet $700 to win $100) to win, while Guerrero is plus-475 (bet $100 bet to win $475).

Boxers Floyd Mayweather Jr., left, and Robert Guerrero, right, pose for photographers with Mayweather’s adviser, Leonard Ellerbe, second from left,
Boxers Floyd Mayweather Jr., left, and Robert Guerrero, right, pose for photographers with Mayweather's adviser, Leonard Ellerbe, second from left, and Oscar De La Hoya, during a news conference, Wednesday, May 1, 2013, in Las Vegas. Guerrero will take on Mayweather for Mayweather's WBC welterweight title on Saturday. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

None of it dents the confidence of Guerrero, a six-time, four-division world champion who understands the Showtime pay-per-view event is the biggest fight of his life.

Guerrero said he will be unaffected by the sideshow aspects to the bout, including a Wednesday news conference tirade by his father, Ruben Guerrero, who called Mayweather a "woman beater."

"It's fight time," he said. "All this stuff here doesn't mean nothing."

Guerrero isn't the first man who believed he could beat this generation's top pound-for-pound fighter. Mayweather has survived everyone's best punch -- often eluded it -- and maintained an unblemished record.

"There isn't a blueprint on how to beat me," Mayweather said. "No one has found a way to break the Mayweather code."


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So what factors must come into play for Guerrero to have at least a chance to deliver the upset?

  • Age: While Guerrero is 30 and presumably in his prime, Mayweather is 36, the age at which boxers -- and athletes in many sports -- begin to face a decline. It hasn't shown so far, but perhaps to combat that, Mayweather worked harder and longer than usual to prepare for Guerrero. He also brought his father, Floyd Mayweather Sr., back as his trainer after dissatisfaction with his defensive performance in his most recent bout.

  • Rust: That fight was one day shy of a year ago Saturday, and produced a unanimous decision over Miguel Cotto. But Cotto caused Mayweather some trouble, winning three rounds on the cards of two judges. Mayweather hasn't faced a live opponent since, partly because he spent two months in jail last summer for a domestic violence case involving his ex-girlfriend. He has fought just five times over the past eight years. Guerrero's most recent bout was an impressive Nov. 24 decision over favored Andre Berto.

  • Style: Guerrero will bring power and aggressiveness, and he's a southpaw. All those could weigh in his favor, but they offer no promises. Mayweather is adept at turning an opponent's aggression against him, so Guerrero cannot be careless. "All 43 of my opponents had a game plan and all 43 opponents came up short," Mayweather said.

    This is Guerrero's big moment, a fight he secured perhaps because he caught Mayweather's attention by handing Berto just his second defeat. Mayweather claims he'd never heard of Guerrero before then.

    Guerrero isn't buying it, especially after Mayweather insisted on a rematch clause.

    "It's like he says, 'I don't know who Robert Guerrero is, but I want a rematch.' Sure," Guerrero said. "He knows what he's getting into."

    They both do.