Click photo to enlarge
Dave Martinez, CEO of Dave Martinez Technologies LLC and the self proclaimed Google Glass Evangelist, gives a talk and demonstration of Google Glass to students of the Future Business Leaders of America Club at College Park High School in Pleasant Hill, Calif., on Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. (Dan Honda/Bay Area News Group)

PLEASANT HILL -- It was a chance to get a glimpse into the future.

More than 75 College Park High School students squeezed into a classroom for a lunchtime look at Google Glass at a Future Business Leaders of America meeting and to try out the innovative wearable smartphone.

After a quick video and demonstration, students eagerly took turns peering through the Android-powered, eyeglass-like device expected to be on the market in 2014.

A succession of amazed teens gazed through Glass at the crowded classroom giving verbal commands and exclaiming, "Awesome!"

"It was really cool!" exclaimed sophomore Natalie Gonzalez as she handed Glass to the next student.

It is "fantastic," said senior Wilson Tran and club president Wesley Xia, who encountered the new technology at a Mini Media Faire in Berkeley.

"Dave Martinez Technology, LLC, Google Glass Evangelist is a third-party developer of the wearable smartphone that is the future," Wilson said.

The club founders immediately decided to invite CEO Dave Martinez, and Ana Huante, the CTO, to speak to the newly formed group.

Glass has a futuristic design and a wearer's view is similar to wearing any normal pair of lightweight glasses, but with a small rectangular screen in the upper right corner of the right lens -- a mini high-resolution screen equivalent to a 25" high-definition screen from eight feet away.

Student Janna Gauthier noted that it did not hinder her eyesight.

Google Glass has GPS capability, a camera with video which functions with Bluetooth and through a MyGlass companion App, which requires Android 4.0.3 plus.

The wearer might tap or brush the side of the frame and say, "OK Glass, take a picture and share it with Mike." The interactive device then sends the picture.

Huante said that it can distinguish commands from normal conversation.

During the demonstration, one wearer was able to send an image of the solar system to another wearer to identify a constellation.

One student tested Glass, holding her own smartphone at arm's length to snap a photo of herself taking a picture. An onlooker asked, "The big question is, can Glass take a self-feed." Apparently not at this time. Her smartphone did not work.

However, Martinez said the devise is suitable for use in a wide range of professions such as medicine, law enforcement, for the blind and for seniors.

"We are working on a keyboard and 3D augmentation," he told the rapt teens.

Wesley said that club members and guests are not only interested in new technology, but they want to learn about business and how to turn technological ideas into financial success.

Among myriad questions was the cost of the device.

"Glass will be about the same as a smartphone when it comes to market," said Martinez.

Glass may be available for $1,500 now, according to the Glass website, if the purchaser is invited, and willing to participate in practical use research.

College Park junior and future engineer Min Heo said he was excited to be at the presentation.

"I joined FBLA because I wanted to learn more about business and negotiating with businesses."

Future Business Leaders of America-Phi Beta Lambda was founded in 1940, and now has more than 200,000 members.

Business leaders and educators offer guidance to students with the primary objective of helping students transition to business, according to the website.

Contact Dana guzzetti at dguzzetti10@gmail.com or call 925-202-9292.