OAKLAND -- When it was all over and the reality of a 49-20 Raiders defeat had set in Sunday, free safety Charles Woodson was asked if there were clues to suggest Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Nick Foles could throw seven touchdown passes in a game.

"I don't think Nick Foles has ever seen anything on film that would give him any indication he'd throw for seven touchdowns," Woodson said. "Nobody thought today he'd come in and have this kind of day."

Yet that's how the Raiders arrived at midseason as the remnants of a crowd of 51,751 filed out of O.co Coliseum in either stunned silence or vocal disgust.

Foles had more touchdown passes than incompletions, hitting 22 of 28 passes for 406 yards in joining Peyton Manning earlier this season and five others for the most TD passes in a single game in NFL history.

Considering coach Chip Kelly pulled Foles from the game in favor of Matt Barkley, with more than nine minutes to play, the Raiders were fortunate to only share a standard for futility.

The Raiders are 3-5 -- same as last season -- instead of the 4-4 they'd hoped to be before entering a brutal road stretch. There was no building on the previous week's 21-18 win over the Pittsburgh Steelers, and it was a big hit to the reputation of a defense that was starting to gain national attention for its play.


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Woodson thought the Raiders might have been reading their press clippings, but coach Dennis Allen, after his team gave up the second-most points in his coaching tenure, wasn't so sure.

"I don't know if that was the case or not," Allen said. "We all have to understand that in the NFL, you have to come out and be fully prepared mentally, physically, spiritually and emotionally ready to play."

Foles' touchdowns came on passes of 2 yards to Brent Celek 17, 63 and 5 yards to Riley Cooper, 25 yards to LeSean McCoy, 46 yards to DeSean Jackson and 15 yards to Zach Ertz, the rookie from Stanford.

The Raiders generated almost no pressure and faltered in coverage (cornerback D.J. Hayden in particular), with one of the scoring passes to Cooper and one to McCoy coming against no discernible defender in the secondary.

Foles had missed the previous week's game with a concussion, and the Eagles had scored 10 points in the last two games combined -- both losses.

"We tried some five-man pressure. We tried some four-man pressure. We tried some max-drop, and really, nothing worked," Allen said.

The Eagles (4-5) set a torrid pace with their no-huddle offense, and the Raiders, after talking about being ready for it all week, were flat-footed all day.

"They came out firing on all cylinders, and we couldn't match their tempo," cornerback Tracy Porter said. "Usually, we're the team setting the tempo, but they came out ready to play. They out-executed us, point blank and simple."

The Eagles scored so fast -- with only 22:06 in time of possession to gain 542 yards -- that the Raiders ran 92 plays and gained 560 yards.

Quarterback Terrelle Pryor completed 22 of 41 passes for 288 yards and two interceptions and ran 10 times for 94 yards. Pryor left in the fourth quarter with a knee injury he said he doesn't believe to be serious.

Running back Rashad Jennings ran 15 times for 102 yards, scored on an 8-yard run and caught seven passes for 74 yards. Jeremy Stewart scored on a 2-yard run in the game's final minute.

Yet the Raiders failed to keep pace when the Eagles were running away with the game in the first half, and the yardage figures were more a result of playing catch-up than anything else.

"I think if you look at this game and the manner in which it was played, it's hard to say there's a lot of positives in any regard," Allen said.

Foles was asked afterward if he had ever thrown seven touchdown passes before.

"Only in a video game," he said.

For more on the Raiders, visit the Inside the Oakland Raiders blog at ibabuzz.com/oaklandraiders. Follow Jerry McDonald on Twitter at twitter.com/Jerrymcd.

  • Pryor, McFadden leave with injuries. PAGE 4

  • Rookie Hayden has rough day. PAGE 4