LONDON -- The IOC's medical director says the doping retests from the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin involve 350 samples and are based on intelligence that targets athletes and events considered most at risk for cheating.

Dr. Richard Budgett tells The Associated Press the Olympic body is spending about $500,000 on the retesting program but says it's possible no positives will be detected.

Budgett provided the greatest detail so far of the IOC's reanalysis of the Turin samples, which includes an improved steroid test that can detect drug use going back months.

The IOC stores Olympic samples for eight years to allow for retesting. With the deadline for the Turin samples expiring in February, the IOC is doing last-minute retesting to catch any cheats who got away at the time.