Snowboard star Shaun White, 27, talked to a handful of reporters in the fall, answering a wide range of questions about his life and the 2014 Winter Olympics. Some of the highlights:

"As far as competing goes, I never realized I was getting older until I did my run and the announcer at the bottom said you're the oldest competitor today. I'm like 'Whoa, that's a shocker.' "

-- White, on aging

"With age, I've learned a lot more about myself and how I get things done and when to push forward or not. That's the only that I carry with me that the other guys don't."

-- White, on experience

"I always jokingly talk about snowboarding as a funny sport. You can take the chair lift. We're going downhill. You just need the strength to deal with that pressure."

FILE - In this Feb. 17, 2010, file photo, Shaun White, of the United States, celebrates his gold medal in the men’s snowboard halfpipe finals at
FILE - In this Feb. 17, 2010, file photo, Shaun White, of the United States, celebrates his gold medal in the men's snowboard halfpipe finals at Cypress Mountain in West Vancouver, Brtish Columbia, at the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Winter Games. White heads to the Sochi winter Olympics as arguably the most famous athlete competing: "It's going to push me to do things I never would've done before," he says. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Sean Kilpatrick, File) (Sean Kilpatrick)

-- White, on what it takes to compete

"It's always hard for me switching from snowboarding to skateboarding. I had no endurance."

-- White, comparing his two action sports.

"There has always been a funny difference between the X Games and the Olympics because in the X Games you're judged by your peers on your progression. If you do new tricks and push the boundaries of what you did the year before you're going to get a better score. The Olympics is a bit more structured in the judging format. Don't quote me on the judging format because I really don't know. I just do my run and put my best foot forward and hope they reward me for that."

-- White, comparing the X Games to the Olympics

"My training on the mountain changed dramatically where I used to go up and ride all day long. I just don't do it anymore. I show up and do a couple runs and that's the best I am going to be all day. I slowly get worse. I get warmed up and I ride my heart out for about two hours and then leave."

-- White, on making Northstar-at-Tahoe his home base.

"The weather is great. They know how to build the courses extremely well. It's hard to show up at a random mountain and just hope whoever is driving the cats making the jumps know what they are doing, what hours of the day the sunlight is on what wall of the halfpipe, or when the jumps are in the shades from the trees."

-- father Roger White, on predicting his son's action sports success

"We didn't know for sure. There was a spark there but you never know what is going to happen. He was only a little kid. You don't know if he could want to ride motorcycles or something and be over it in a year or two.

-- Roger White, on his son's competitive life

"Usually you don't have a run like this. These guys have been trying to beat him since he was 10 years old. That's why he went pro. It started getting ugly there because they couldn't get near him."

Contact Elliott Almond at 408-920-5865 and follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/elliottalmond.