The crash didn't break them, it bonded them.

Lauryn Williams and Elana Meyers laughed off smashing their bobsled into a wall a few days ago, knowing this wasn't the time to let anything get in their way of winning an Olympic medal.

The gold is right in front of them now.

And for Williams, a special place in Olympic history is within reach.

Williams, a former sprint champion who decided to give bobsled a whirl six months ago, and Meyers lead at the halfway point of women's Olympic bobsled, which has turned into a three-team race with two of them decked out in red, white and blue.

With Williams using her world-class speed to propel her teammate off the starting line, Meyers made two trips down the Sanki Sliding Center track in 1 minute, 54.89 seconds Tuesday to open a 0.23-second lead over Canada's Kaillie Humphries and Heather Moyse, trying to win their second straight title after getting gold in Vancouver.

USA-2's Jamie Greubel and Aja Evans are in third, 0.56 back of their teammates, who know anything can happen in Wednesday's final two heats.

"It feels pretty good, but we've got a lot of work to do," said Meyers, who won bronze in Vancouver pushing for Erin Pac. "Kaillie's a great driver. Jamie's driving great as well. It's not over."


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Williams, a two-time sprint medalist in the Summer Olympics, is attempting to join Eddie Eagan as the only athletes to win gold medals in different sports in both the Winter and Summer Games.

While one American track star is nearing a medal, the more celebrated one is further away.

This time, Lolo Jones isn't close.

The former hurdler is in 11th with teammate Jazmine Fenlator in USA-3, 1.84 seconds behind Meyers and Williams and 1.28 seconds out of third. Jones hasn't given up, and she's putting on a brave front despite knowing her medal chances are minuscule.

"I'm just going to take it day by day, for sure," she said.

Women's giant slalom: Slovenia's Tina Maze captured her second gold medal of these games. She finished 0.07 seconds ahead of Anna Fenninger of Austria. Defending champion Viktoria Rebensburg of Germany was the bronze medalist, and teen sensation Mikaela Shiffrin of the U.S. was fifth in her Olympic debut.

Last week, Maze tied for the gold medal in the downhill in glorious sunshine. On Tuesday, the sun seemed lost in the hills. Maze marked the moment in the spirit of Michael Phelps, simulating a breaststroke in the icy slop. "We are all wet, so I said, 'Why not?' " Maze said. "It's been a great day for me."

Speedskating: Jorrit Bergsma set an Olympic record with his time of 12 minutes, 44.45 seconds in the 10,000 meters to lead another sweep of medals for the Netherlands. He was followed by Sven Kramer and Bob de Jong, sending the Dutch to their fourth podium sweep at this venue and giving them a total of 19 speedskating medals.

South Korea won the women's 3,000-meter relay, passing China on the last lap to take the lead. Four years ago in Vancouver, the South Koreans finished first but were disqualified for impeding, and China got the gold. Italy took the bronze, giving Arianna Fontana her third medal in Sochi.

Biathlon: Emil Hegle Svendsen of Norway edged Martin Fourcade of France to win gold in the men's 15-kilometer mass start biathlon. They both finished in 42 minutes, 29.1 seconds, with Svendsen's ski crossing the line a fraction ahead. This was Svendsen's fourth career Olympic medal but first in Sochi. Ondrej Moravec of Czech Republic won bronze for his second medal of the games.

Ski jumping: Norway delivered a one-two finish in the men's Nordic combined large hill. Joergen Graabak broke away from a five-man group with about 100 meters left in the cross-country race, finishing six-tenths of a second ahead of Magnus Moan. Fabian Riessle of Germany won the bronze.

Curling: Britain reached the semifinals in men's curling by beating Norway 6-5 in a tiebreaker. The game came down to the final shot, and British skip David Murdoch delivered. The British will face Sweden in the semifinals Wednesday while Canada plays China.