LAS VEGAS -- San Jose State's quarterback competition continues into fall camp, as has been expected all along. Joe Gray and Blake Jurich will battle for the right to succeed David Fales, now with the Chicago Bears.

Spartans coach Ron Caragher likes the idea of continuing the competition to ensure that he has not just one, but two quarterbacks ready if needed. He believes Gray and Jurich both fit the bill.

"The one thing they both lack is game experience," Caragher said.

SJSU opens camp Aug. 1 and has its final scrimmage Aug. 16, 12 days before the season opener against the University of North Dakota. Caragher acknowledged that could be around the time he'd like to name a starter.

"Right around there," he said. "If it was obvious before, perhaps. The nice thing about the scrimmage or scrimmages is it's as close to a game as you can get."

Gray thrived in the spring game, completing 17 of 20 passes for 192 yards. Jurich was just 4 of 9 for 34 yards. Fans and observers walked away with the impression that Gray was firmly ahead in the quarterback competition. Does Caragher agree?

"I do agree that Joe had a really good spring game. It was good. It was nice to see," Caragher said. "But I also think, wholistically, they both had good springs. It would be hard to say one has the lead going in because it's kind of a clean slate."


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The duo will split repetitions with the first team at the start of spring. Junior college transfer Malik Watson and true freshman Ian Fieber will work with the third and fourth teams. But Caragher wouldn't rule out giving either of those a few shots with the top units.

"Anything can really happen," he said. "I think there would have to be something with (Gray and Jurich) where they stumble and those other guys are just, wow, catching our eye, to make a change. We feel pretty good about (Gray and Jurich). But also as a coach, you like to stir the pot a little and see and I think they'll get a couple shots, not just delegated to the third and fourth teams. We'll probably throw them in and mix them up with another group and see how they respond."