OAKLAND -- While coaches Mark Jackson and George Karl continued firing shots Wednesday regarding alleged dirty tactics against Stephen Curry, Curry was ready to move on to new business.

Curry said undue focus on the mounting physicality in the opening-round playoff series can only do a disservice to himself and his Warriors teammates as they try to finish off the favored Denver Nuggets at Oracle Arena on Thursday night.

"Nobody's really talking about it in the locker room," said Curry. "We're just approaching Game 6 like normal. You can't get distracted by that. We have a chance to close out the series at home. It's a big opportunity we have to take advantage of."

Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry (30) argues with referee Eric Lewis (42) after he was called for a foul in the fourth quarter of Game 5 of their
Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry (30) argues with referee Eric Lewis (42) after he was called for a foul in the fourth quarter of Game 5 of their first-round NBA basketball playoff series against the Denver Nuggets, Tuesday, April 30, 2013, in Denver. The Nuggets won 107-100. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Jackson, however, continued to zero in on the Nuggets' rough treatment of Curry, specifically what he viewed as an intentional kick by forward Kenneth Faried to Curry's ankle.

"I can live with physical basketball. Taking a stab at Steph Curry's ankle is not physical basketball," Jackson said. "If you attempt to kick him with your foot on his foot, that's not a basketball play. That's a cheap shot."

Karl responded to Jackson's assertions at Denver's Wednesday practice.

"My basic reaction is he's watching a different movie than I'm watching," Karl said. "If there's a scorecard and we're in a boxing fight right now, they're winning the fight. We won a round (here and there), but I'm going to tell you, I'll go to any arbiter now and show the dirty shots -- they're winning."

For Curry's part, while claiming after the game that he may have been the target of Nuggets "hit men," he softened that stance and wasn't even sure that Faried's act was intentional.

"When I looked at the film afterward, we did kind of get our feet tangled up a little bit," Curry said. "I don't know what (Faried's) intentions were, but I'm not worried about it. I'm just going to try to play my game."

So why was Jackson continuing to belabor it?

"Coach is just doing his job as a coach to bring attention to what he feels should be looked at," Curry said. "But as players, we're not going to get caught up in that mini-game of letting a foul hard here or a foul hard there take away from the way we've been playing in this series."

Faried said couldn't understand what all the fuss was about.

"I thought they were mad about the shoulder, honestly," he said. "I wasn't going for his ankle at all. I wasn't trying to. I wasn't even thinking about his ankle, honestly. I forgot it was injured."

  • Center Andrew Bogut exited Game 5 with 6:20 to go in the third quarter and didn't return, but both Bogut and Jackson said there was nothing physically wrong.

    "Bogut's our starting center," said Jackson. "He's played a huge part in this series and will continue to. We just put a run together (without him)."

  • Klay Thompson said it'll be critical for the Warriors to take advantage of the home court from the outset and not let the Nuggets establish the tempo.

    "We just have to match their physicality and exceed it, we can easily do that at Oracle," he said.

    The Denver Post contributed to this report.