At the border of Alamo and the Danville is the Alamo Pioneer Cemetery. Established in the 1850s, it is the final resting place for many of the pioneers who settled the San Ramon Valley more than 150 years ago.

Established in 1856, the cemetery is part of the Alamo-Lafayette Cemetery District. The district consists of two pioneer cemeteries, one located in Lafayette and the other in the Danville. Both are public cemeteries, nondenominational and nonprofit (supported by an endowment fund district).

Currently, ground burial sites in the Alamo Pioneer Cemetery are only available for existing family sites, although niches are available for cremated remains. Trained docents of the Museum of the San Ramon Valley provide special walk-through tours to teach about the cemetery and the many pioneer families. Tours include historic characters that stand by "their" grave sites to share stories.

Some names important to early Valley history include: Jones, Wood, Stone, Bollinger, Baldwin, Humberg, Boone, Cox, Young, Love, Close, Wiedemann, and Hall. Since the sites are supported by tax dollars through the endowment fund, only residents of the tax district can secure a resting place in the cemetery.

Charlotte Elmere Wood, daughter of Charles Wood, was an author of many poetry books and a teacher at Sycamore Grammar School for 30 years. Charlotte Wood Middle School in Danville is named after her. James O. Boone, a Daniel Boone relative, also has his resting place at the Alamo Pioneer Cemetery.

In addition to the historical figures key to the community, the cemetery also offers a view of another integral part of history. The variety of headstones showcases the craftsmanship and artistry over the years.


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One can view the diverse designs crafted by the Freemasons along with other historic symbols still in their original form.

A visit to the Alamo Pioneer Cemetery can help visitors and local residents understand local history.

For more information regarding The Alamo Pioneer Cemetery and special walk-through tour, call the Museum of the San Ramon Valley at 925-837-3750.